Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Sustainable Mushroom Growing

 
Posts: 30
Location: Reno, NV
fungi trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just thinking about a sustainable mushroom growing model that works. I have some ideas but wondering about any ideas that you might have. With other words you grow the mushrooms on some plant waste: what kind of plant wastes would you use and what would you do with the spent substrate? how would you integrate this at your farm?
 
gardener
Posts: 945
Location: Ohio, USA
172
dog forest garden fish fungi trees urban food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am working on incorporating several different species into my homestead.

Garden giant: this has already been set loose. It grows on grows in compost, wood chips, cardboard, kind of pops up wherever. I got a kit for indoor growing and then when spring came I set it free.  It is supposed to be compatible with garden crops, so I hope to spread it throughout my planting area. It's very distinct.

Shitake and lion's mane: It likes fresh hardwood. I have a tree row and below that I'm working on copice trees. This is for wood burning, but will also be a source of shitake and lion's mane logs.

Morels: These are supposed to grow native here in woodlands, so I would like to give it a try. Supposedly you just need to scatter a slurry of innoculant and hope for the best. Another distinct looking mushroom easy to spot.

Oyster mushrooms: These are incredibly easy to grow on almost anything. They are startable from store bought. I even had them in mason jars. My only problem was neglect. My hope for these in the more distant future is a container set-up inside that needs no more care than a house plant and set them to rotate blooms so I am in constant supply. I'll probably feed them paper, wood chips, cardboard, leaves, straw, sticks, etc. I have kids in school. They bring home paper all the time. They will be the only kids in their class that can say: "My mushrooms ate my homework. "



 
gardener & author
Posts: 530
Location: Tasmania
261
homeschooling goat forest garden fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation pig wood heat homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Log cultivation seems like a good idea for places with plenty of trees - no plastic needed at all.

Shiitake seems to be the most popular mushroom to grow in this way, but I've also seen spawn plugs of oyster, king stropharia, namomoko, reishi, and pioppino - I was wondering how these would all go?

I've also read about innoculating woodchips and other mulch with king stropharia - another plastic-free way to grow mushrooms.

Any wood/mulch left over at the end of the process turns into soil for plants.

What are your ideas?
 
Daniel Tura
Posts: 30
Location: Reno, NV
fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cool! I appreciate your answers. Indeed paper is great, most mushrooms eat that like crazy :) I'm also thinking of coffee grounds and some other substrates like tea bags and artichoke leaves or nut shells, pretty much household stuff ready to be recycled. Lawn grass would be another one. Yup morel slurry should work, did that this year in may and I'm waiting for spring to come to see if anything pops in there. Very few succeeded to grow this one..
 
The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts -Marcus Aurelius ... think about this tiny ad:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!