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Thermopsis mollis, Allegheny Mountain Goldenbanner - know anything about this?

 
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I just got home from my a save-the-natives plant sale at the State Botanical Garden in Athens, Georgia, and I scored what I went for: three pawpaws and a black chokeberry. But I also picked up a plant called Thermopsis mollis, Allegheny Mountain Goldenbanner, which was tagged as being of the Fabaceae family, so I was hoping that means "nitrogen-fixing." It was the healthiest plant I saw at the sale. Now that I'm looking online for it, I'm not finding any info about edibility. Is anyone here familiar with this plant?



 
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uswildflowers
Forestry service info

Those two give most of the information on the Thermopsis Mollis plant.

Note: while it is a legume, and the local name has pea in it, this is not an edible, live stock won't, and shouldn't touch it as a food source either.

Redhawk
 
Diane Kistner
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:uswildflowers
Forestry service info

Those two give most of the information on the Thermopsis Mollis plant.

Note: while it is a legume, and the local name has pea in it, this is not an edible, live stock won't, and shouldn't touch it as a food source either.

Redhawk



Thank you, Redhawk. The edibility thing is what I wanted to know.

Just been reading more about the quinolizidine alkaloids, to the best of my ability as a lay person. I'm wondering: Would this have value planted as a nitrogen-fixer in a guild to help keep deer away from other valuable plants? Or would that be a mistake?

 
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Diane Kistner wrote: I'm wondering: Would this have value planted as a nitrogen-fixer in a guild to help keep deer away from other valuable plants? Or would that be a mistake?



I was thinking the same think Diane when I was reading through the description that said it discourages wildlife browsing.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Yes, this plant is a nitrogen fixer and it will keep browsers away, it has no allopathic compounds, so it can be a good guild protector plant. (really good question, Diane and Steve)

Redhawk
 
Diane Kistner
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:Yes, this plant is a nitrogen fixer and it will keep browsers away, it has no allopathic compounds, so it can be a good guild protector plant. (really good question, Diane and Steve)

Redhawk



YAY! Now I wish I had bought a few more....

 
Bryant RedHawk
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Next spring simply trim some of the new growth and root the cuttings.
 
Diane Kistner
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:Next spring simply trim some of the new growth and root the cuttings.



I just saw that this plant is critically endangered in Georgia, so that gives me a great reason to really baby it and make more of it.

 
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