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Atherton Raspberry - Tropical Berry!

 
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Hi all,

Here's a pic of my Atherton raspberry plant, still very young.

It's native from south to north Queensland, as well as tropical areas north of Australia. I'm in Brisbane, a sub-tropical climate, so I'm delighted to have a berry that likes hot summers and mild winters, so you don't have to worry about getting enough cold days in the winter.

The fruits are bigger and drier than a normal raspberry, but definitely still taste good.

Here's a link to some more info:

https://tuckerbush.com.au/atherton-raspberry-rubus-probus/
Raspberry.JPG
[Thumbnail for Raspberry.JPG]
 
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Thank you Russell. I didn't try anything that I could call a berry, when I was in the southern Philippines. There's not much of a season at all, but it looks like maybe this berry doesn't mind. We are on about the same latitude as southern New Guinea.

I like that it's a big berry and that they don't seem to grow deep inside the plant where the thorns are, but instead are borne on the outer edges.

Do you know if they become quite thorny once they are 3 metres tall? Could they be planted tightly enough to form an impenetrable barrier for livestock or people?
 
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