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liquid fish

 
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Location: east and dfw texas
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I fish a lot and have a 55 gallon plastic barrel I put fish leavings in have been doing this for couple of years .
use it in my garden ,
what is your idea on what it's worth does it help or needed ?,
i can tell when i use it that plants do better but man does it smell.
 
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I tried it and let it sit for a year. It still contained bones and scales. I expected them to be gone.

Is yours decomposing completely? If so, can you give some details on your setup?

I say it is a good use for the leftovers. Someone smarter than me can explain why it is good.

 
gardener
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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hau Jimmy,
I turn the left overs of my fishing trips into fish emulsion to use on all our plants and trees. It starts as you describe then it goes through a blender before dilution and use.
Fish have been used for feeding plants for eons and they are one of the best at providing many of the needed nutrients.

Redhawk
 
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it used to be well known fact that the native americans would plant fish with corn seed to ensure a good crop.
it does not have to be broken down just put your filleted fish racks and heads directly in your garden soil
 
jimmy gallop
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wayne fajkus what i have is still full of bones and such but they seem to stay to the bottom
I do a row garden and it slopes one end to the other when I lay out a row i will use a hoe to cut a furrow put water hose down at high end and just pour the fish stuff into it water it well then when water soaks in I will spread my seeds out in the row ,cover them they come up quick.
thank you all for replying
 
pollinator
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You guys must not have bears raccoons coyotes.  Around here the fishiest I could get is seaweed, as we're constantly reminded a fed bear is a dead bear and to remove all attractants.
 
pollinator
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We used fish guts on a large scale back in the 1980's back when the fishing industry in Maine was booming. There was a smell to the air, but not that bad because the fish guts were knifed in. That is, they were injected in liquid form directly into the soil as a harrow broke open the soil...think Yeoman Plow here with fish guts being injected at the plow points. This was all done because of the smell. On a smaller scale a person would just have to till, then cover the soil over afterwards...like immediately afterwards, but the results are impressive.

Today we cannot get fish guts, but we can get seaweed in bulk. There is a cost, about $1.90 per ton, and it comes in 90 ton loads. It is billed as a "lime"...as it sweetens the soil the same as lime does, but gives some fertilizing abilities as well. It does really well at getting the minor nutrients up in the soil. This is broadcast over the soil like lime is. It has a smell, but it can be tamed by spreading just before a rainfall. The smell is like a kitchen that is boiling lobsters...not too bad, but distinctive.
 
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