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Yellow Horn - Xanthoceras sorbifolium

 
gardener
Posts: 357
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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Has anybody grown this? This website has some interesting things to say about this small tree: http://yellowhorntree.com/Home_Page.html

• Yellow-Horn can live for over two hundred years.

• Crop yields reach 95 percent by year five of age.

• It grows in areas with precipitation as low as 6 inches annually.

• It matures in height to 22 feet and 14 feet wide.

• With proper nutrition and moisture fruit yield can be 8 tons per acre.

• Average oil yield is about 850 gallons per acre. Higher yields are possible.

• The pericarpof the fruit contains 12.2 percent furfural.

• The seed and capsule combined has 40% oil content. Seed alone has 72%.

• Yellow Horn is USDA approved for entry, and is non-evasive.

• The leaves are alternate, pinnate, 6"-8" in length with an odd number of leaflets.

• Leaflets are approximately 2" to 2 1/2" in length.

• Flowers cluster in panicles on terminal ends of branches & lateral branches.

• Individual flowers are white, and approximately 1 inch across.

• The throat is initially yellow then turns red in maturing.

• Flowering occurs in early to middle April and lasts for about 10 days.

• Fruit is a 3 valve capsule containing 3 seeds 1/4 to 3/8 inches diameter.

• Fruit matures in July or August.

• Flowering can commence in the second year of age.

And the leaves & flowers are edible! I've ordered 3 seedlings from Burnt Ridge to try them out, they seem like a great temperate climate permaculture crop.
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Sounds like an interesting shrub/tree. It is often called "Chinese Flowering Chestnut", as the pea sized seeds are reported to taste like sweet chestnuts.

I may have to get a packet of seeds and give them a try.



 
Posts: 76
Location: Seboeis Plantation, ME
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forest garden
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I am trying now to grow this plant. I got a good supply of cold treated seed and am excited about trying.
 
pollinator
Posts: 755
Location: zone 6b
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I had one. It was lovely, no pests or diseases. But tho it had lots of blooms I *never* got a single nut! They make wonderful foundation/landscaping plants for edible landscaping, tho. The bush had some flowers that were white/yellow and some that were white/pink at the same time, very very pretty.

Mine needed pruning/training the first few years, it had some floppy branches that tried to lay on the ground. After that it was low-care.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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ive got 30 young trees, well see what they do in the next few years.
 
Posts: 9
Location: Rollingdam, NB Canada
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I bought some seed to grow thinking that I could selling them as a landscape plant and then I saw their food and medical uses. Has anyone been able to grow them in US or Canada commercially is there a market?
 
Posts: 184
Location: Zone 4 MN USA
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Here's a picture of mine started from seed this winter. It seemed to really get shocked from the transplanting, but it came back well recently. It will be interesting to see how it handles a MN winter.
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 1559
Location: Denver, CO
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Anyone have any updates?

What is the Omega profile of the oil like?
 
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