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help with grafting

 
pollinator
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I want to do some grafting soon and am sort of confused on how deep to cut into the root stock in order to do a bark graft.  
I see where some indicate the green layer is where you want the scion to interface with the root stock and it seems that others are going a little deeper into the wood for grafting.
My first attempt will be on an asian pear but the next will be a plum.  

Are there any visual sources to get good and usable information?
 
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hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
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Grafters handbook has good pictures. I have it as an ebook but I’m thinking about upgrading. I’ve been whip/tongue grafting as far down as I can go for my field grafts. If you can’t match up widths it’s basically the same idea as a cleft graft. The amount of wood retained in the graft is only important in how much structural integrity it has until the graft has callused and formed structural wood of its own I would say. Cambium contact is the most important for initial graft survival and first year growth in my limited experience.
 
Dennis Bangham
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My confusion is how deep into the rootstock to create the wedge for bark grafting.  I watched a Pawpaw grafting video at Univ Kentucky where Neal Petterson went about 1/2 inch  into the maybe rootstock. He described it as the Phloem and the inner layer was the cambium.  
I think that is where I went wrong in the past and treated the outer green layer as the cambium where I should have gone in a little deeper.
I have downloaded the ebook and decided to do the oblique cleft graft.
thanks for showing me the ebook.  Good buy for $4.
 
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I have similar questions as this will be my first year grafting. I'm following this topic and also wonder if anybody has used a lower priced grafting tool with much success? I received one as a gift. I have invested in some good rootstock and don't want to waste time/$$ on something that's doomed to fail.

 
Dennis Bangham
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After lookiing over the grafting book, I decided that the oblique cleft graft is how I will go for top dressing.

No special tools needed.  

I like the idea of slightly tilting the scion to ensure contact between the cambium layers.

I will use the wax from the wax ring used to seal toilets along with some silicone sealant to fill the wedge.  I have refrigerator tape and Parafilm for the scions.  
 
Tj Jefferson
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There is no bark graft in the grafters handbook . Here is a representation of the images for you to evaluate.
1CB73E7E-B1F6-45B9-B519-F8CB00AD811B.png
[Thumbnail for 1CB73E7E-B1F6-45B9-B519-F8CB00AD811B.png]
 
Dennis Bangham
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That looks like it would take coordination.  Not one of my better points.
 
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Location: PA
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Scott Stowers wrote:I have similar questions as this will be my first year grafting. I'm following this topic and also wonder if anybody has used a lower priced grafting tool with much success? I received one as a gift. I have invested in some good rootstock and don't want to waste time/$$ on something that's doomed to fail.

Hi Scott, I bought one of those and it seemed to work well in cutting a very clean sort of tongue and groove in smaller branches,  but I didn't have any better success with those as opposed to my grafts that were made with a knife. I'm new at grafting and have almost no skill.  My success rate was about 20 percent.  Following the advice in this post would probably get you better results. You might have more luck posting this question as a new topic - you'd probably get more views from people who have advice on these tools while keeping the post flowing. Good luck!. Regards, Tim
 
Tj Jefferson
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Dennis btw I grafted the plums all over the place. Each plum tree has at least three and sometimes four different cultivars on it. It should be hilarious. I am going to graft some wild plums as well this next week since we are getting a frost that is unexpected by me at least when I grafted. Bark is definitely slipping so should be ok.

Persimmon are going to be bud grafts and a couple cleft grafts. Should be fun
 
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Location: NW Montana
goat forest garden trees
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I have beautiful scion wood for apple, pear, peach, plum and others.  Not a internet social media person and find these site a difficult navigation so please repost or write to m if I posted incorrectly.  GRAFTER  Grafting is easy.... a pocket knife and electric tape or flagging tape even works!  Wrap em tight seal open cuts so nothing dehydrates.  PM if you want to talk about grafting, varieties and buy sticks at $2 ea
20180918_114712.jpg
NW montana grown
NW montana grown
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Heirloom Pears
Heirloom Pears
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Early Fugi and Gala and Liberty
Early Fugi and Gala and Liberty
 
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