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Materials to use for a Free Standing Wood Stove Hearth Pad

 
Posts: 44
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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I need to build a wood stove hearth pad. When I search for ideas on the internet mostly expensive manufactured pads come up or people using materials that are toxic. I want to use ceramic tile for the top of the pad but what can I use so not to destroy my oak flooring or burn down my house. I don't plan on staying in this house forever and may take the pad and wood stove with me before I put my house up for sale in the future. These new EPA approved stoves say to cut a hole in the floor for an air pipe to help combustion and I would need to build around the hole or be able to cut a hole in it. Any safe inexpensive ideas?
 
gardener
Posts: 3744
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
1025
cat pig rocket stoves
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Hi Susan;
This is what we do when building rocket mass heaters.  To start use some parchment paper to lay on the hardwood. Use clean new clay bricks. Lay the bricks flat, leaving room between them. Cut to size and place a sheet of 1/2" hardy board (concrete board) on top of the bricks.

You are now ready to install your tile.  

Oh and this is just my opinion but... unless you are living in a brand new super tight house.  Skip cutting a hole in the floor.  
Any normal house has plenty of air leaks to keep a supply of fresh air available.


 
Susan Boyce
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Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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Thank you for responding. My house was built in 1948 and I replaced the windows but there isn't any insulation in the walls and I plan on pumping rock wool into them. Will my house still be drafty enough to fire the wood stove properly?

Lay bricks down with no mortar on parchment then hardi backer….. Is the hardi backer green I have heard conflicting stories. I think for ascetics I would want to also lay an edge around the hearth. I want it to look easy on the eyes and wanted to add ceramic tile for the top too...
 
thomas rubino
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Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
1025
cat pig rocket stoves
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Hi Susan;
Yes, in my opinion, in a 1948 house, even after you insulate there is enough air getting in to run any wood stove. Small leaks add up and each time a door is opened the whole house gets recharged.
As far as the hardy board. Is it green ? Well its concrete board so pretty inert. Its 1/2" thick with nice edges. Should take tile quite well.  I find red brick very pleasing to look at but you could cover them up with tile as well if you liked.  
 
Susan Boyce
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Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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I'd have to look at it before deciding it needs an edge but tile over the plain cement would be nicer to look at and am concerned I might chip or dent the cement board over time. I'm very happy to hear I don't need another hole in my floor, right next to the area I'm going to put the heath down was a hole the previous owners left me hidden under the carpet that I threw out. I didn't want to go thru the labor of pulling up nearby slats to match, I need to do that in the living area later...

IMG_1645.JPG
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Hole with just plywood subfloor
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Patch with subfloor and oak tongue and groove
 
thomas rubino
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Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
1025
cat pig rocket stoves
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Hi Susan;
What a surprise to find under your carpet!  Excellent job of repair you did as well !
I hope you looked for buried treasure under there before closing it up.
 
Susan Boyce
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Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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Yes its always nice to receive gifts you didn't ask for LOL

Thanks for your help!
 
Susan Boyce
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Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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I forgot to ask if I can use regular red clay bricks, I have solid and the ones with holes. Also how far apart should they be. Can the ones around the edges be closer or touching as not to get dust etc in the cracks on the edges?
 
thomas rubino
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1025
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Hi Susan;  
Yes , regular clay bricks.  And yes to your question about allowing them to touch all around the outside edge.
Be sure to use enough under the feet of your stove, that is where the weight will be.,and plenty under the rest just for support.
 
Susan Boyce
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Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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Thank you Thomas
I'll use plenty of bricks to hold the stove weight and leave cracks in-between until I get to the edges. Thinking I'll use the ones with small holes just to make good use of them, can't see em!
gift
 
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