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Can I safely use a wood stove insert as a free standing stove

 
Posts: 19
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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I picked up a wood stove that is barrel shaped rear flue sitting on a built in pedestal with a side door, the glass is in the front. Most of the stove would sit outside the fireplace (if I had one) and only the flue would be sitting in the fireplace. If I use a double walled elbow as well as double walled flue, would it be safe to use it as a freestanding stove on top of a hearth?
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opposite side with draft
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pollinator
Posts: 292
Location: North central Ontario
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That is the weirdest stove I've ever seen... Do you have a fireplace now and wanted it to be an insert? it looks like its meant to freestone and vent through a wall. no reason I can see that it could not go up a chimney from a fireplace. you would want to line the chimney usually with flexible stainless or your insulated wall would work great as well. you would want to seal the rest of the opening so you don't vent too much heat. Distance to combustibles on older stoves is usually 24"
Cool,  David
 
gardener
Posts: 2274
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
303
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Hi Susan;  
In my opinion that should work just fine.
As long as your using correct spacing from wood floor joists  and or rafters.
I'm not sure you even need double wall pipe leaving the stove. Only when going thru floors or roof.
 
Susan Boyce
Posts: 19
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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Thank you Thomas
I think when you use double wall pipe you can set the stove closer to the wall without worry of heating up the interior wall
I plan on using ceramic tile for the hearth but don't want it directly on the oak flooring so Maybe some wood other than plywood that has glues etc in it. Trying to stay green!
 
Susan Boyce
Posts: 19
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
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David,
No its says right on the stove tag its a fireplace insert,  wanting to use it only as a free standing wood stove. Froze my butt off last year when the power was out for days here in Oregon
 
thomas rubino
gardener
Posts: 2274
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
303
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For a hearth Susan, consider using plain clay brick.  
Lay them flat with at least 4" space between them.
Cover with 1/2" thick hardy board (concrete)
Heat will be able to disperse underneath and your oak floor will be safe.

If you liked  you could still use tile on top of the cement board.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3196
Location: Toronto, Ontario
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I would be cautious about wood-burning appliances sitting atop timber construction.

As a child, we had the family home burn because of an improperly installed woodstove. It sat atop a clay brick surround in the corner,  which was pretty good, for the most part, that sat atop wooden subflooring and joists, which turned out to be not so good, for the most part. The heat constantly transferred through the brick to the underlaying wood, which dried, kiln-like, until some single event that pushed the wood to ignition, probably a single ember popped out onto the brick itself.

Understandably, I prefer fuel-burning appliances of any kind to sit atop their own non-flammible foundation.

-CK
 
Forget Steve. Look at this tiny ad:
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
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