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What are you mulching your blueberries with?

 
Posts: 98
Location: South Central Kentucky
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Just curious what people are mulching their blueberries with, successes and failures?
 
steward
Posts: 2482
Location: FL
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Welcome to Permies.

Rotten oak leaves. I add more leaves to the surface each year. I've tossed down some compost, then mulched with leaves. The oak leaves have a pH of around 5.6, so the plants love it. The moisture remains long after it rains, and my worm population is thriving. Depth of mulch is about 4 inches.

Last year I had troubles until I got more fence up. The bed was doing well with the compost and mulch, lots of bugs and grubs. Couldn't keep the chickens away from it. I had 6 blueberries, they scratched up 5 of them.
 
pollinator
Posts: 476
Location: Bothell, WA - USA
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Free wood chips: pine and fir with some needles mixed in -- they are enough to keep most grass out, low mold count...but creeping buttercup and horsetail still breach the forcefield...
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Just don't fall into the trap of using coffee grounds for blueberries, or any other acid loving plant. Coffee grounds lose their acidity once they are brewed. Unbrewed, they are highly acidic, but once brewed, their pH raises to +/- 6.9

 
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The ones we planted when I was growing up liked the pine straw.
 
Posts: 112
Location: Mountain West of USA, Salt Lake City
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Random leaves. My one plant was planted in a pot last fall and it seems to have over wintered all right. I'll have a better idea of its situation in a week or so.
 
gardener
Posts: 357
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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Pine needles, straw and rotting leaves of mixed origin.
 
Posts: 153
Location: Orgyen
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I like to use a combination of maple leaves, blueberry leaves and homemade Douglas-fir chips.
 
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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Coffee grounds and hardwood mulches. I use the grounds to deter pests typically.
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