• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

Planting under mulch but on top of cardboard?

 
Posts: 31
Location: Georgia, USA, 7b
1
kids hunting urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tried a garden for the first time last year, but i didnt really have any mulch on the soil, so everything ended up baking and dying. Last fall, i added brown corrugated cardboard over everything, and then a few inches of wood chips. My guess is that it averages three inches deep now, about four months later. I want to start planting next month, and i have lots of different flowering plant seeds for pollinators. My question is, do i need to make a hole through the cardboard and mulch for every single seed, or would the seeds grow if i just made a hole in the mulch? i am unsure if it is too deep to germinate, and punching a hole in the cardboard is some extra effort, although i imagine its pretty soft now. thanks.
 
pollinator
Posts: 11804
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1096
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
From my experience and seeing experience of other people who use cardboard, you definitely need to cut a hole for each planting area.  I think most folks put some good soil or compost in the hole to plant in.

If you don't put a hole in the cardboard the roots are going to tend to grow on top of it and die.

 
pollinator
Posts: 352
88
dog trees books bee medical herbs
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've done quite a bit of research regarding the use of cardboard in growing a garden and I would definitely say to punch a hole in the cardboard. I bought a quality used dibble for that purpose which seems like the perfect tool for it.
 
gardener
Posts: 2136
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
505
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Or for small seeds, move the mulch away and seed into the soil, and then after the plants have grown a bit, mulch around them.
 
adam johnson
Posts: 31
Location: Georgia, USA, 7b
1
kids hunting urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Alright, I think I was trying to avoid extra work, I should have known better. Thanks for the advice.
gift
 
Diego Footer on Permaculture Based Homesteads - from the Eat Your Dirt Summit
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic