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My best friend got poisoned, now has broken shoulder/ribs. Home health care input welcome.

 
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So mid February my best friend of 10 years got poisoned.  Still not sure how it happened for certain.  I've identified the culprit as aldicarb poisoning.  Temik is a brand name commonly sold and used as coyote bait.  It's an organophosphate.  

The day after ingestion I found her trembling, high fever, eyes rolling around, not responding to stimulus, breathing hard and fast, etc.  I thought she'd had a stroke.  I use herbal medicine with some self exercised skill.  I mega dosed her on activated charcoal, got a good dose of usnea down her in case of infection, and gave her an herbal mixture to reduce fever and thin the blood a bit.  Anything I could think of to save her.  The second day she was worse overall but fever was better.  I gave her more usnea and charcoal.  Kept her hydrated.  She was non responsive on day 2.  I waited for her to die in my arms.  Day three she was lingering and the fever was gone, her liver began to fail.  By day 5 her abdomen was horridly distended and she was in intense pain trying to move.  She almost seemed blind and deaf, but wasn't.  I kept her on charcoal and basic herbal supports.  We were 5 days out from the last time she pooped and 3 days out from the last pee.  That night her body came back online a bit and  she peed a massive amount, her body deflated and she was no longer in pain.  She finally pooped a slimy yellow sludge, stained black with charcoal (I knew it was yellow because it stained the snow all around her and she had yellow mush on her bum too).  The poop was sickly sweet, almost fungus smelling.  It was a little disturbing.  I started to research poison but nothing fit, most poisons cause gastric distress and kill quickly.  Then she got up and started walking.  I had no idea what to think at this point, it was starting to seem like it wasn't a stroke. Day 7 she relapsed with her liver, blew up like a balloon, but it was short lived.  Day 8-10 she improved in eyesight and stimulus response, she was up on her feet, ate and drank for me on her own.  Til then, and after this point, I was hydrating her and getting a pint to a quart of homemade bone broth down her every day.  But while she was improving in other areas, she started walking drunk and losing motor control.  On day 10 she was fully paralyzed.  She could move her mouth enough to drink and she could move her eyes, but that was it.  That's when I crunched internet research and found aldicarb poisoning.  Clinical signs of survivors include peripheral nervous system shut down 7-14 days after exposure.  It includes extreme blurred vision, dizziness, "drunkenness", the muscles that control the eyes are interfered with.  It commonly causes pancreatic failure (didn't read anything about liver, but maybe it was her pancreas that failed, I dont' know).  The poison does not cause gastric distress, it's a nerve agent.  And it can take up to 20 hours to take affect.  The list goes on, every facet of aldicarb poisoning I read about shed more and more light on her situation.  And it was relieving, honestly.  The day she went fully paralyzed, once again, I was braced for her to die.  I had no idea what was wrong.    I thought, this is it.  All this struggle and this is the climax.  But it was confusing because she was otherwise the picture of health.  She didn't LOOK like death.  She didn't LOOK like her body was dying.  She was home, her eyes were bright, her mind was goin', she ate and drank on her side for me, but the body wasn't online for her.  
Over the next 7 days I continued to support her in similar ways, hoping it was the poison, hoping the charcoal had been enough (it was a basic emergency protocol since I didn't know what was going on, it couldn't hurt her any!).  I made her do physical therapy with the laser pointer, which she loves.  Every day was baby step improvement; first she was able to start moving her head around very slightly, then she was able to hold herself in an upright-laying position without me stacking blankets and pillows around her.  Then she was able to, with a little help, get herself from a laying-on-side to laying-upright position.  Her legs had been stuck out totally rigid and I had to bend them for her to get her upright, but she regained control over them bit by bit.  She got to where she could be helped into in a standing position, with lots of support of course, and not crumple back to the ground.  And with some advice from a friend I started dosing her with electrolytes and B vitamins.  On day 24, since it all began, she walked on her own for the first time in 14 days.  IT was REALLY sloppy, but she did it.  And she started improving leaps and bounds with each passing day.  Over the next 3 weeks she regained herself to 99%.  Something is buggered up with her up-close vision now, but otherwise she's seemed normal.  She's had a few bouts of abdominal swelling but I've been treating her for infection and it goes away.  She had lost close to 20lbs over that 24~ day period, all muscle mass, and she's regained at least 10 of it back and is running and jumping and playing.

And just when it seemed like she was in the clear, she started backsliding.  She had 2 or 3 days of progressively becoming "drunk" again.  Wobbly.  Uncoordinated.  Stumbling.  I started her back up on electrolytes and B vitamins and it didn't seem to improve her, though she didn't get worse.  Then yesterday, to my horror, she followed me up into the hay loft and I turned around just in time to see her stumble and fall face first off the edge.  She had about a 6' drop onto dry dirt, she landed on the crook of the left shoulder.  She was obviously a little messed up from it she half walked, half got carried home (she's 70lbs and we're a few acres away from our livestock).  She has some swelling and heat in her shoulder, and I have felt bones shift around a bit in her shoulder or ribs when I picked her up.  I can't pinpoint whether it's the scapula or the ribs behind it, but I highly suspect the ribs behind it as her scapula isn't experiencing acute swelling; the area around it is.  Nothing poking out, no blood under the skin, and she's not in extreme pain.  We now pick her up and move her with the two of us so we're not bear hugging her and lifting her in this state.  I'm keeping up on the supplements.  I've shaved her shoulder and have been applying comfrey poultice to the shoulder.   She is cool, calm, and collected.  Seems mentally clear and is sleeping fitfully.  She ate a good meal yesterday but has chosen to fast today.  I'll gauge her tomorrow regarding more food.

She's broken bones before.  So have I.  This break wouldn't be worrying me nearly as much if it wasn't for the fact that she'd been backsliding before it happened.  I've been puzzling and searching for how these symptoms of her poisoning could flare back up 3 weeks after recovery.  She can adjust herself in bed to her liking right now.  She has twice gotten up and moved herself across the house when I wasn't inside (OUCH!!!).  But I'm nervous because in her current new state, I can't keep an eye on her poison symptoms.  I don't know how much of her pain and inability to walk right now is the injury (obviously a lot of it is) and how much is this lack of coordination and control that was setting in 2-3 days before this happened.

Don't talk to me about going to a vet.  I make my choices, you make yours.  I can't afford to walk in the door, let alone pay for xrays, tests, exams, surgeries, and pills.  I choose home health care and self education as a result.  I've doctored myself and a ton of critters, sewn things back together, splinted and mended breaks, closed some nasty deep wounds, healed torn eyelids, deep punctures, abscesses of all sizes- the list goes on.

Anyway.  What I'm looking for is any insight to what things I might be able to do for her from this point.  In the complexity of her current situation, and in regards to bodily healing (versus symptom relief).  I'm afraid of overlooking the symptoms of poor coordination while the break is healing.  I don't understand why these symptoms were/are coming back.  Reading about aldicarb poisoning is really tough- most of my information I found in human case reports, obviously no official human studies have been done, and there's not a lot of info on long term complications in survivors.  My understanding is that the peripheral nervous system failure/complications are from certain centers of the brain being hyper excited and over-producing certain hormone or chemicals that bugger up the nervous system.  It's hard to sift through the medical jargon that comes with researching this.  I would say it's apparent to me that she did NOT get re-exposed, but rather this is lingering damage or lingering excitement or lingering chemical buildup from the incident.  That's my best guess?  
 
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I'm so sorry you're all having to deal with this, and I hate how careless &/or just plain cruel some people can be! I personally, would concur with your assessment. I'm not a vet, and you seem to have had quite a bit more experience in it, than I. But, I think that some additional nutritional/ herbal support might be your best bet, at the moment. I'd definitely keep up on the charcoal, B, and bone broth, and maybe add some fresh, raw apple (high in quercetin & flavonoids, so supports immune function, and healing; nettle, for added nourishment; and if you have chickens free-ranging, a raw egg or two, per day, with the shell, to boost her Vit D, protein & calcium, to strengthen her muscles and help whatever injuries there are to her bones.
 
Jen Fan
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Thanks, Carla.  It was hard deciding to post here, but I'm just so stressed about this I'd like some exterior input.   Late last night she ate a hearty helping of deer meat and eggs.  I didn't mention, but we feed the dogs 100% raw meat stuffs. We raise a lot of meat right here on the farm.   During her tribulation period, initially, she was on the bone broth, raw eggs, powdered colostrum, organ meat, and cooked bones for the most part.  I don't recall every detail, but she wasn't too interested in whole meat chunks at the time.

Today she seems blind in one eye, like she did back in the early days of the poisoning.  I use the laser pointer to gauge this.  She's addicted to the laser pointer!  She responds to it and bites at it when it's in her left eye's field of view, but as soon as it passes to the right eye she stops seeing it or responding to it.  It's got me real worried.
She took herself outside and pooped and peed, but was stumbling and 'drunk'.  A big part of that is her shoulder pain but I know some level of it is the poison issue.

I didn't think there was any chance of re-exposure, and I assumed if she re-ingested Temik somehow it would look the same as it did the first time.  We have no idea where she found poison, it certainly wasn't on our property!  Anyway, I don't have her on charcoal anymore; my understanding of AC is that it's only useful when the toxin is present in the stomach or intestines.  It binds unbiasedly to everything in its path.  If I use AC in the absence of poison, it would then be stripping nutrition out of her system.  That's my understanding of it, anyway.  It's not a poison-seeking agent.  Correct me if I'm mistaken.  And aldicarb is a nerve agent (developed for war originally).  It hyper-excites parts of the brain and leads to nervous system burn out, basically, from what I understand of it.  It's not like a lot of other poisons that pollute the body and cause bleeding and other horrible things.  In a way I should be very thankful of that.

If she DID re-ingest it somehow, I don't think charcoal would work at this point, considering this is day 5 or 6 since her  lack of coordination and stumbling began again?

She's hardly been out of my sight since the first incident (I've been paranoid about where she got into poison!), and we have 3 other adult dogs + 3 young puppies.  I have a hard time seeing her be the first one to find and eat bait.  She doesn't leave the property, she's a good old girl.
 
Carla Burke
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"Anyway, I don't have her on charcoal anymore; my understanding of AC is that it's only useful when the toxin is present in the stomach or intestines.  It binds unbiasedly to everything in its path.  If I use AC in the absence of poison, it would then be stripping nutrition out of her system. "

Absolutely correct, by my understanding. I was thinking she'd gotten into it/ it had gotten into her, again. I'll think on it some more, but I'm m sure there must be something that can bind with it in her bloodstream or at least interrupt it, in her nervous system. Can you get her some raw oysters? The selenium in them is a pretty powerful antioxidant (among other benefits, in the heart, lungs, and brain) and might help clear some of it out. Oysters have an incredible amount, but other things, like halibut and sardines have a decent amount, too. I obviously can't promise anything, but, maybe it could help.
 
Jen Fan
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Carla Burke wrote:
Absolutely correct, by my understanding. I was thinking she'd gotten into it/ it had gotten into her, again. I'll think on it some more, but I'm m sure there must be something that can bind with it in her bloodstream or at least interrupt it, in her nervous system. Can you get her some raw oysters? The selenium in them is a pretty powerful antioxidant (among other benefits, in the heart, lungs, and brain) and might help clear some of it out. Oysters have an incredible amount, but other things, like halibut and sardines have a decent amount, too. I obviously can't promise anything, but, maybe it could help.



I'm having doubts both ways today.  She's getting floppy again, her eyesight is being impacted pretty rapidly today, and she's knuckling under when she tries to use her limbs.  Identical to the first round of poison just before she went paralyzed, albeit these things happened a week after her initial exposure on the first go round.  They happened after her fevers, tremors, and liver problems resolved.

I mega dosed her on AC just now, I guess it can't hurt any if it's just a few times.  I didn't expect her to go downhill this quickly again.  I will wait a good 4-6 hours before dosing her with electrolytes and B vits again.  She ate another hearty meal of half a rabbit + 2 rabbits worth of organ meats.

I'll keep oysters in mind!  I would have to look for them at a grocery store, but we won't be going into town for awhile yet.  I presume farm raised oysters probably lack much of the potential benefit compared to wild oysters?  Not familiar with oyster farming, but if it's anything like other 'seafood' farming, I would have my doubts about it.
*edit, if selenium is what we want, and I can't find oysters...  I'll look into what other sources of selenium there are, or look for supplement options (though I'd prefer a whole food, but it'll be whatever I can get in town)
 
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I am so sorry to hear about your friend, Jen. What a sad situation. You clearly care for her deeply. It's been a long road already and I hope it all ends well and she is feeling back to herself again very soon. Thank you for posting your journey in helping her, and thank you, Carla, for your responses. It's all been very educational, although I wish it were only a theoretical situation.
Please keep us updated, Jen. I'll be thinking about your friend and sending her thoughts of health.
 
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Oysters are one of the best canine-safe sources, and yeh, I'm pretty sure wild, ocean oysters would be the best, but sardines are good, easy to find, and relatively inexpensive, in a can. In fact, in this case, that can might not be a bad idea, because the canning would kill off any parasites, and you wouldn't need to wait for freezing them, to kill 'em. In fact, frozen raw oysters might be just what you need, for the same reason, and should be less expensive than fresh, to boot.
 
Jen Fan
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Carla Burke wrote:Oysters are one of the best canine-safe sources, and yeh, I'm pretty sure wild, ocean oysters would be the best, but sardines are good, easy to find, and relatively inexpensive, in a can. In fact, in this case, that can might not be a bad idea, because the canning would kill off any parasites, and you wouldn't need to wait for freezing them, to kill 'em. In fact, frozen raw oysters might be just what you need, for the same reason, and should be less expensive than fresh, to boot.



I will definitely try it!  I know I'll find sardines at the very least.  Too bad she hates sea food :P  I'll get em in her one way or another.  We will probably hit town Tuesday or Wednesday.  We're pretty remote and are still snowmobiling in and out right now.
 
Carla Burke
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Wait, look what I found!! Beef & lamb liver are really high, too - and you're already doing the beef liver, right? Maybe just making that a higher concentration, for her would do it - especially since she's not big on fish lol.
https://www.nutritionadvance.com/foods-high-in-selenium/
 
Jen Fan
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Carla Burke wrote:Wait, look what I found!! Beef & lamb liver are really high, too - and you're already doing the beef liver, right? Maybe just making that a higher concentration, for her would do it - especially since she's not big on fish lol.
https://www.nutritionadvance.com/foods-high-in-selenium/



She's gotten lots of deer liver, that's her main source.  We collect permitted roadkill deer and use 95% of the animal.  She's also gotten chicken, turkey, pigeon, pig, and rabbit liver, which we raise here.  I prioritized her on the rabbit organs last night, saved all the liver and hearts for her to eat.  I'll keep doing so.  But I'll also get some sardines n such just to be sure.  Thank you.

Last night she had a seizure.  It was scary.  I've never dealt with a seizure before.  I thought she was having a heart attack...  She started swallowing and chomping really hard and fast and it escalated over about 10 minutes.  She started panicking and I knew something bad was going to happen.  We determined she wasn't choking.  She drank like 1-2 quarts of water, it's like she felt that something was stuck in her throat even though it wasn't.  I stayed with her and kept her in one place since she was panicking and trying to get up.  Then she convulsed and threw herself backward and started thrashing.  I held her, her heart was slamming around in her chest and I thought "this is it".  Then she went rigid and started shaking all over and drooling and frothing and I realized maybe it was a seizure, not a heart attack.  We got a piece of kindling into her mouth to keep it open and I scooped the froth out of her throat to clear her airways, held her head at a decline and let the drool pour out.  She relaxed somewhat, legs out rigid, and layed there staring off, rhythmically chomping the wood.  Then after a time she came around, spat the kindling out and laid upright.  
She was in terrible pain.  I'm sure thrashing undid all the healing progress her body had made on her shoulder area.  I tried to help her stay calm but the pain was driving her mad.  I gave her more wood to chew up and she desperately chrunched it to bits and started panicking again, trying to scoot around and get away from the pain.  I was afraid she's work herself into another seizure (not sure if that's how seizures actually work, but I was worried about it regardless).  So I dosed her with some herb-infused oils to sedate her, as well as more electrolytes, and stayed up with her until she was fitfully asleep and relaxed.  It was a long, tiring night...

She's doing very well today, all things considered.  She's calm and relaxed and I'm going to keep her sedated more studiously because her ribs and shoulder need to re-heal now.  We'll be going to town soon as we can and I'll also get her some MSM powder.  Her coordination is actually much better today, she's tried twice to stand up and walk, and she's not knuckling under or criss-crossing her legs.  But her shoulder's so sore that she can't put any weight on it.  That's a huge step backward -_-'  
But the shoulder is not the scary beast to me.  Bones heal.  I know what happened to it.  What I don't know is what's happened to her nervous system and brain.  Seizures ARE a part of aldicarb poisoning.  I'm now wondering if she did get re-exposed.  Both these incidents of possible poisoning happened after the dogs were off the property and not in our sight (chasing us a few miles down the mountain when we snowmobile out).  Last Sunday was the day before her symptoms came back and the first and only day we let the dogs run without us keeping pace with them and monitoring them (since we feared someone leaving coyote bait near the road).  We chose to relax that day and let them run at their own pace and just catch up with us down the road...

I spoke with a friend who used to be a vet tech (who helped me through round 1) and her opinion was that if the symptoms are poison related, there's no way they'd be residual from the initial incident 6 weeks ago.  It would either have to be re-exposure, or something like a brain tumor interfering with her functionality.  Unfortunately with aldicarb poisoning, unless you collect urine in the first 24 hours and test it, there's no way to know if that's what it was.
 
Jen Fan
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Someone has recommended lion's mane for her.  Some quick searching indicates it's likely safe for dogs.  Any thoughts on that?
 
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I've never looked into lions mane, but I don't see why it would do any harm. Some mushrooms are really good for them. It's worth a shot. I'm glad she's doing better, today, and I'm sure last night was terrifying... I hope she keeps improving...
 
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She's doing much better all things considered.  If this is anything like it was last time it'll be a constant 2 steps forward, 1 step back.  Only I'm not on the edge of my seat about her dying this time, which is making it much easier.  I feel like if she hadn't buster her shoulder region up, she'd be back on her feet right now.  She's still having neurological symptoms, particularly in her eyes, but she can stand up and walk and is quite balanced and coordinated.  Her break hurts her though, she can't go far (and I don't want her trying).  She's not knuckling under or crossing her legs right now.  Her lack of mobility seems to be limited to her injury at this moment in time.  I've been keeping her sedated and on total bed confinement.  I can totally see her trying to navigate outside and falling off the porch or stumbling and whacking her bad side on a boulder.  >_<  Not happening on my watch!  She's an intensely active and high strung dog, bed rest is nigh impossible for her without some herbal aid.  Another day or two and I think she'll be back to where she was before the seizure, in terms of her shoulder.

This eye thing happened last time around.  It started in one eye and I thought she went blind in that eye.  Then it spread to both and I prepared myself to have a blind dog (if she pulled through).  Then the first one got better, then they both cleared up over 2 weeks.  The eye is unfocused and non-responsive to visual stimulus, and the pupil response to light is entirely inappropriate.  It will remain tightly contracted most of the time, but occasionally be inappropriately dilated and, either way, will not change with light changes. Right now it's her right eye.  Her left is still servicing her.  These are also classic symptoms of aldicarb poisoning, from what I read.  I'm sure the apparent "blindness" is a mix of tightly contracted pupil (so her vision is darkened) and extremely blurred vision (part of the 'drunk driving' and lack of coordination and finesse).

Anyway...  I got her MSM and lion's mane.  She absolutely will NOT eat anything I put even the tiniest bit of lion's mane powder in :/   I'm yet undecided if I should force it on her or take that as her own wisdom about not ingesting it.    I intended to get the oysters/sardines but lost my list during our all-day town run and I KNEW I was forgetting something for her, darn it!  I need to whack some more rabbits, I'll save all the liver for her.  We'll have some packages arrive in town, possibly end of the week, maybe I can swing by the grocery store one more time.  We're trying not to run a muck all over town right now, of course.

Edit/side note, we had to jump through some weird hoops to get the MSM.  They keep it under lock and key and you need ID to purchase it and they keep track of who's buying it.  I had to research it because it seemed silly.   Apparently it's used to cut meth with?  You learn something new every day in the most unexpected ways!  
 
Carla Burke
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I think it sounds like you're settling into a solid path of healing for her, and you seem to have a good handle on it. Personally, I'd probably not force it on her, but I can't speak to the wisdom of that, other than following her instincts. I think you mentioned some other mushrooms, but can't recall which. I know reishi has some amazing immune boosting and I believe autistic benefits that might help her. If she's getting plenty of liver, and seems to be making progress, I wouldn't force the oysters, either. Just remember that once this is all over, to go back to her normal,  smaller amount of liver. Keep us posted...
 
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Carla Burke wrote:I think it sounds like you're settling into a solid path of healing for her, and you seem to have a good handle on it. Personally, I'd probably not force it on her, but I can't speak to the wisdom of that, other than following her instincts. I think you mentioned some other mushrooms, but can't recall which. I know reishi has some amazing immune boosting and I believe autistic benefits that might help her. If she's getting plenty of liver, and seems to be making progress, I wouldn't force the oysters, either. Just remember that once this is all over, to go back to her normal,  smaller amount of liver. Keep us posted...



Thank you, Carla, I will.  I don't think I mentioned any other mushrooms, but I can look into others.  The friend who recommended lions mane said it's indicated for nerve repair and detoxing the blood.  I haven't researched it in depth but will continue to read on it, as well as Reishi.

 I'd be intensely interested in anyone's first hand knowledge about these symptoms, about aldicarb poisoning, etc.  It's REALLY hard to read in-depth information about pesticide poisoning.  
I found one great resource, a rogue study of a collection of agricultural workers who got exposed and were monitored.  Studies in animals only give basic info and are limited to observation (versus first hand descriptions of what's happening from a human victim).  For instance, in animals you read "appears drunk", as the symptom observation.  From humans, you read "dizziness, extremely blurred vision, head pain, etc".  Which is the 'reason' for the observed 'drunkenness' in the animal.  Learning that extreme blurred vision was part of the experience helped me understand the confusing "sometimes seems blind, sometimes doesn't" observation I had in her during round 1.  When she went paralyzed back in early March, I thought she was dying.  When I read about survivors (human study) experiencing peripheral nervous system failure 1-3 weeks post-exposure, it completely changed my mentality about her tribulation and I was able to definitively start treating her as though she was recovering from poison, rather than as though her body was dying and thinking of her as 'being on hospice'.  

I have a hard time believing that she could go through these kinds of tribulations, with no medical intervention, and make an almost-full recovery in just a few weeks if it were an escalating brain tumor?  Paying for an MRI is not feasible, I can't rule that out via imaging.  Would a tumor cause liver failure (and/or possible pancreatic failure; whichever of the two would result in the body halting fluid processing, abdominal swelling, and subsequent yellow sludge poo after recovery)?  Would a tumor cause her lymph nodes to swell to the size of soft golf balls?  Would a tumor, or its interferences, cause her feces to have a ghastly sickly-sweet fungus aroma?  Would it cause a fever?  I honestly don't know.  But it feels less likely to me, with what limited knowledge I have.
 
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I'm so sorry this happened to your friend. It is eerily similar to what happened to my little friend Ethel except the culprit there was something called tremorgenic mycotoxins. http://riverroadveterinary.com/compost-toxicity-in-dogs/, it was awful but she pulled through and was her old self for two years when she passed away suddenly from kidney failure. She was 14, and seemed happy and healthy, we will never know if it was a residual effect of the toxin.  
 
Jen Fan
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Mark Reed wrote:I'm so sorry this happened to your friend. It is eerily similar to what happened to my little friend Ethel except the culprit there was something called tremorgenic mycotoxins. http://riverroadveterinary.com/compost-toxicity-in-dogs/, it was awful but she pulled through and was her old self for two years when she passed away suddenly from kidney failure. She was 14, and seemed happy and healthy, we will never know if it was a residual effect of the toxin.  



I'm sorry to hear about your dog as well :(   I'm glad she had 2 happy, healthy years after the incident!  I initially ruled out poisoning because she never vomited.   Almost all poison issues I read about involve vomiting.  That's one other thing about nerve-agents like aldicarb; they don't generally induce gastric distress and they're not often thrown up.  She also seemed fine going to bed but woke up with issues.  I've read timelines on aldicarb range can range from 2 to 20 hours post-exposure before major symptoms arise.

We don't have any composting food items, all of our kitchen mics. goes to the pigs.  The only compost we have around here is old poopy hay.  She's also an ultra picky eater and not food motivated at all, I would think if it was eating bad food one of the other ravenous food hounds would be the victims.  That's very interested to read about though, and a good thing to bear in mind!

She just pestered me into taking her out to pee.  Even sedated, she's finally had enough of peeing herself and is refusing to continue peeing her bedding (that's getting changed as needed).  She's been holding it since last night >_>  The booger.  So I caved.  She walked (virtually dragged me around she was going so fast...) like a champ on her shoulder and was well coordinated.  She's 'blind' in her left eye still and is having navigation issues as such.  She's weak and her limbs are stiff and she's still hurting quite a bit.  But it was heartening to see...  I'm always reserving a small readiness for it to go south on me, but I am hopeful, once again, that she can pull through this a second time.
 
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Jen Fan wrote:... but I am hopeful, once again, that she can pull through this a second time.



SO good to hear!
 
Jen Fan
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Her shoulder is now back to 100%, it would seem.  It will probably be awhile before I see her run and jump, but she's no longer having issues getting around on it.

Her impairments at the moment are intense nerve pain throughout her limbs (doing lots of pain control to keep her sane), and her vision changes.  The right eye is slowly coming back and the left is slowing going out.  Her right eye, the one that went "blind" first, got super bloodshot for awhile and started eliminating thick mucus.  I've been flushing it with usnea and holy basil tea and it's cleared up wonderfully.  I don't think the eye washes are encouraging the return of normal sight, I think that's a time-thing, since it happened like this last time.  She can see light changes in it now and isn't totally 'blind' on that side anymore.

I decided to insist on her taking the lion's mane since the nerve pain has started up and it's supposed to be specific to nerve repair. Systemic nerve pain is also an observed stage of recovery from aldicarb poisoning.  I'm certainly not against the possibility of it being something else, but so far both cases have totally fit the signs of this poison.  This time around it's been way easier on her though, if it was poison she didn't get much of it.  
Doing powdered dock leaf for liver support, small amounts of holy basil in her food for pancreatic health and over immune support, a few other herbs, MSM dosing per the container's dog guidelines, and lots of raw eggs, good fats, bone broth, bone, meat, and organs.

A hawk tried to snatch and grab one of the puppies yesterday!  AH!  Now I've got 2 patients in the infirmary...  The pup will be fine, but she'll need a few days.  It hooked a talon inside her ear and she has a deep puncture in the folds of her cartilage (ooooouuuuch), a slice/puncture across her scalp, and some minor cuts on her face.  Super relieved the puncture in her ear wasn't INSIDE the ear canal itself, that would've been really bad.  

When it rains, it pours.
 
Maybe he went home and went to bed. And took this tiny ad with him:
Rocket Mass Heater Manual - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/8/rmhman
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