• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • r ranson
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler
  • Mike Barkley

Beans and garlic; how close is too close?

 
pollinator
Posts: 1707
Location: Victoria BC
263
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am planting a bunch of types of dry bush beans.

I have overly wide paths between my garlic beds, due to tractor geometry. Plenty of room for a row of beans down each path..

But, lots of sources say that garlic will stunt beans...

How close is too close?

What is the mechanism responsible for the stunting?


Has anyone experienced stunted beans that they would blame on garlic, or grown them close with no issue?
 
pollinator
Posts: 699
Location: Utah
175
forest garden fungi bee medical herbs writing greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

D Nikolls wrote:But, lots of sources say that garlic will stunt beans...

How close is too close?

What is the mechanism responsible for the stunting?


Has anyone experienced stunted beans that they would blame on garlic, or grown them close with no issue?


It won't answer the primary question, but I have learned that garlic puts out sulfur through its roots. I had a sulfur deficiency in my natural (non-chemical) hydroponics last year and this year I tested putting a clove of garlic in several of my buckets. The plants with the garlic had distinct signs of sulfur toxicity (stunting, burning leaf edges, lower uptake of nitrogen). The problem was immediate, once the garlic started putting down roots. One of these was a bean. Since I took the garlic out it has returned to regular growth. This was in the same net pot, so within inches. I'm guessing that at least part of the problem with bean stunting is sulfur. The bean, of course, wasn't affected by the nitrogen issue, but it was severely stunted and had the burned leaf edges of sulfur toxicity.
 
Posts: 67
Location: Limburg, Flanders, Belgium
33
hugelkultur kids forest garden books chicken writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lauren Ritz wrote:
It won't answer the primary question, but I have learned that garlic puts out sulfur through its roots. I had a sulfur deficiency in my natural (non-chemical) hydroponics last year and this year I tested putting a clove of garlic in several of my buckets. The plants with the garlic had distinct signs of sulfur toxicity (stunting, burning leaf edges, lower uptake of nitrogen). The problem was immediate, once the garlic started putting down roots. One of these was a bean. Since I took the garlic out it has returned to regular growth. This was in the same net pot, so within inches. I'm guessing that at least part of the problem with bean stunting is sulfur. The bean, of course, wasn't affected by the nitrogen issue, but it was severely stunted and had the burned leaf edges of sulfur toxicity.



This is interesting! Would this also mean that it might not be a good idea to plant beans where garlic was (garlic came out in June so beans could go right in after)? Or would the excess sulfur disappear as soon as the garlic does?
 
Lauren Ritz
pollinator
Posts: 699
Location: Utah
175
forest garden fungi bee medical herbs writing greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Sanna Heijnis wrote:

Lauren Ritz wrote:
It won't answer the primary question, but I have learned that garlic puts out sulfur through its roots. I had a sulfur deficiency in my natural (non-chemical) hydroponics last year and this year I tested putting a clove of garlic in several of my buckets. The plants with the garlic had distinct signs of sulfur toxicity (stunting, burning leaf edges, lower uptake of nitrogen). The problem was immediate, once the garlic started putting down roots. One of these was a bean. Since I took the garlic out it has returned to regular growth. This was in the same net pot, so within inches. I'm guessing that at least part of the problem with bean stunting is sulfur. The bean, of course, wasn't affected by the nitrogen issue, but it was severely stunted and had the burned leaf edges of sulfur toxicity.



This is interesting! Would this also mean that it might not be a good idea to plant beans where garlic was (garlic came out in June so beans could go right in after)? Or would the excess sulfur disappear as soon as the garlic does?


I don't know whether it would disappear. I suppose it would eventually. Since beans are a nitrogen fixer, I shouldn't think that the nitrogen issue would be a problem. The pots with the beans weren't just being watered with a sulfur additive, but actually had a growing garlic bulb in with the main plant. I suspect the sulfur toxicity was because of proximity more than the presence of the garlic bulb, but that would be something else to test.
 
He does not suffer fools gladly. But this tiny ad does:
advertising for free (and not-free) on permies.com
https://permies.com/wiki/27826/advertising-free-free-permies
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic