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Fruiting Vine for Arid Zone 7b (Albuquerque)

 
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Hello, All.

I don't know if I'm violating some rule of etiquette by posting in the wrong place or have missed a thread that covered this already, but here goes.

The Situation

We bought our house in September 2019 in urban Albuquerque, with a back yard about 1790 ft^2. We have been making observations and reading about permaculture, and have a pipe-dream of supplying 90% of our food needs in the front and back yards. We want to keep chickens in the back (within 2 years, after we've cleaned out all the hardware), bees on our back porch roof, fruit trees espaliered throughout, maybe a maple in the back for a sort of canopy, and raised vegetable beds in front and back. I haven't yet done a soil test, but we have a lot of pioneers, and I can tell the soil is a lot of clay and sand.

The Short Term Goal

Our financial and time restrictions rule out raised beds, water catchment, and most things now, but we think we can start with a fruit-bearing vine trellised across our back porch. I want to find something at least regional that will provide significant summer shade and a significant amount of edible fruit, that we can responsibly incorporate into our future permaculture garden. We also want fruit that will be safe for chickens should pieces fall, or should chickens forage their leaves. This porch is west-facing, gets about 5 hours of full sun from 1400 to 1900, and is about 9 feet high by 20 ft wide. Because of this I've already ruled out grapes (which will eventually go on a pergola carport in the front, or in the back to double as shade for chickens.) I've considered kiwi most recently.

I would like to hear full, honest recommendations for a fruiting vine, or even general recommendations for our situation! I've been enjoying the threads here. They've grounded me well in my research.

Dylan
 
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Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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Dylan Davidson-Talley wrote:... I've considered kiwi most recently.



This site says no to kiwi and yes to blackberry.
Marionberry grows 20 feet!
 
Dylan Davidson-Talley
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Hi, Burl

Thank you for that. I will look into that. I went to the wordpress whence the pdf originated, and it looks like they haven't done anything in the community since 2015. It did give me an idea, and I looked up the Albuquerque master gardeners. They seem up-to-date and have some resources. The search continues.
 
pollinator
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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forest garden solar
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grape
fuzzy kiwi
hardy kiwi
raspberry/blackberry
espalier fruit trees
 
Burl Smith
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Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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Dylan Davidson-Talley
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Follow-up question, if anyone's still watching. Ideas for creating a guild for marionberries?
 
S Bengi
pollinator
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It's just the usual guild member
N-Fixer: Clover esp dutch white clover, goumi could also be used
Soil Pest: Garlic/Onion Family
Pollinator: Mint/Thyme Family and Carrot/Cilantro Family, they also attract predatory insects like wasp/ladybug
Soil Aerators: Daikon Radish/Tiilage Radish, they also act as dynamic mineral accumulators so can dandelions
Mushroom: Winecap or Oyster Mushroom  
 
Dylan Davidson-Talley
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Awesome, thanks S Bengi.
 
pollinator
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Blackberries are probably the easiest and highest producing plant if they are adapted to your area.

Mars Seedless is a good grape that isn’t too vigorous, ao it doesn’t take over. Good disease resistance too.


You might plant some fruit tree seeds. They don’t usually cost anything. Most need stratification to come up. If you know anyone with a peach tree you might still find a few seeds under  it. They sometimes don’t come up the first year.  I would likely to know if anyplace sells tree seeds that are already stratified.
 
Burl Smith
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S Bengi wrote:It's just the usual guild member
N-Fixer:... goumi could also be used



Mary Cook said: " I put in two goumi bushes--this is a relative of the evil autumn olive, supposed to be non invasive and the fruit is bigger. I got some fruit the second year and several pounds this year. The only downside is what to do with a zillion berries with inedible pits--"

Chickens like them: https://www.google.com/search?q=chickens+goumi&ie=&oe=




 
If tomatoes are a fruit, then ketchup must be a jam. Taste this tiny ad:
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https://wheaton-labs.com/bootcamp
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