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My first really good garden

 
Posts: 13
Location: western NY (Erie County), USA; zone 6a
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I hope I did it correctly as this is my first "big post" reporting on my garden with pictures attached (if I violated some rules or customs, kindly let me know. They're not in any particular order, a few of the garden as a whole, some of particular sections and closeups of a few tomatoes and squash (zucchini and acorn.) Although I have been trying to garden off and on for perhaps ten years, with varying degrees of unfailure and failure, this year's garden has surpassed all previous attempts and I am very happy with how it's going, so far. It may not be much when compared to others among the Growies here at Permies, but to me, I think I can finally say "I can grow stuff." And next year I want to do a slightly bigger garden (to take advantage of some extra fencing and t-posts I have laying about.)

It looks weedy, but the added "biodiversity" doesn't seen to bother anything that I planted. The cardboard takes care of keeping paths clear.

Today I harvested my first veggies, about half a dozen sugar peas.
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pollinator
Posts: 282
Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
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Looking good, Paul!
Out of curiosity, what did you change to bring about the successes? What was your breakthrough realization about growing?
 
Paul Sofranko
Posts: 13
Location: western NY (Erie County), USA; zone 6a
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Chris Sturgeon wrote:Looking good, Paul!
Out of curiosity, what did you change to bring about the successes? What was your breakthrough realization about growing?



Um, I actually have no idea! I guess I would say, just plant stuff and as they say down in New Orleans, laissez bon temps rouler!

I did have a little more time this year, what with the lockdown and self-quarantine because of COVID-19, but not too much more than in the past. I think I just relaxed, put in the fence posts where I could, strung up the available chicken wire (I didn't even bury them by a few inches to prevent critters from burrowing under) put in the outer deer-fencing in, and just planted what I wanted in no regular order. I tossed pots here and there for herbs, flowers and cherry tomatoes, mostly along the edges. No nice rows, nothing like that. I mean, there is a semblance rows, but not too tidy. Everything is just planted around other things, and I hoped for the best.

I had thought that some of the zucchini was being eaten by something, so I went and purchased replacements. I chose acorn squash, actually, instead of more zucchini. I came home, put the acorn squash down on the grass, went off and did something, came back and wasn't looking where I was going and stepped on the acorn squash plantlings. I was a little... shall we say... irked. But I figured, what's the worst that can happen? and so I just planted them elsewhere. Turns out the zukes survived whatever was bugging them and the stepped on acorn squash recovered. (A few of each did die, but most are thriving.)

So, I just decided to relax about the need for me to really do well. If it's gonna happen, it'll happen. If not, oh, well, another year's learning experience. No more wrapping up personal self-esteem with having a good garden. Just plant, chill out, water when needed, tend to it, and there it happens.

EDITED TO ADD: I also practice gratitude. I am a religious and spiritual Catholic, and when I go out there and tend to it, I give thanks.
 
pollinator
Posts: 463
Location: N. California
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Congratulations, there's nothing more satisfying then picking veggies you grew your self.  I think my garden does better mixed around rather than rows too.  Hope everything continues to grow and produce well.  Happy gardening.
 
Put a gun against his head, pulled my trigger, now he's dead, that tiny ad sure bled
how do we get more backing of the brk?
https://permies.com/t/145583/backing-brk
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