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Help Me Identify These Vines, Please

 
pollinator
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I'm not entirely sure what's going on with me but I believe I may have had a reaction to something in my garden.

There are three vines kind of all intertwined, I went in to clear out the morning glory and got a rash on my arm fairly quickly. I quit that and went in to wash off.
This particular garden is all kinds of over run and untamed with who knows what.

So, could you help me identify these two vines?

Edit: I just realized there's a ton of dead vine material in the background... I guess could some of that be something poisonous even if these living vines are not?
Of course... that dead matter could just be the remains of the vine images I posted from last year.

Also worth noting, I was in this same garden bed last year chopping down some weedy trees and did not get rashes.

Vine.jpg
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Second-Vine.jpg
[Thumbnail for Second-Vine.jpg]
Second-Vine-Up-Close.jpg
[Thumbnail for Second-Vine-Up-Close.jpg]
Second-Vine-Cluster.jpg
[Thumbnail for Second-Vine-Cluster.jpg]
 
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Does the first one look like this?


 
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There's this cool app called "Seek".  You can scan plants and it will tell you what it thinks they are.  I've found it's pretty accurate for the most part.  I took the pictures you posted and put them through it.  It's saying that first vine is Texas Virgin's Bower (Clematis Drummondii).  It's saying the other is Jasmine, so I'm not sure if that one's accurate or not, it's not the best picture for this app.
 
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Shaun Hill wrote:There's this cool app called "Seek".  You can scan plants and it will tell you what it thinks they are.  I've found it's pretty accurate for the most part.  I took the pictures you posted and put them through it.  It's saying that first vine is Texas Virgin's Bower (Clematis Drummondii).  It's saying the other is Jasmine, so I'm not sure if that one's accurate or not, it's not the best picture for this app.



There are quite a few apps for smartphones worth trying if that one doesn't work - Google Lens, Leafsnap are both similar.

Just based on the picture Anne posted, the first looks very similar to poison ivy to me. Funny, I thought poison ivy looked different... but I haven't been around it in years.
 
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I don't think the first is poison ivy, the leaves this early in the year have a reddish hue, and the stems aren't green.

I think that the second might be wisteria.
 
Anne Miller
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Kenneth Elwell wrote:I don't think the first is poison ivy, the leaves this early in the year have a reddish hue, and the stems aren't green.

I think that the second might be wisteria.



That might be the case for Boston, Massachusetts.  It has been crazy this year in Texas with all kinds of plants immerging with 100 weather then it turns cool again.
 
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the first one looks a lot like our local native clematis, C. virginiana (virgin’s bower). look for leaves opposite each other, where the leaf stems themselves wrap around things for climbing. not sure it’s the same species but looks very similar. note - poison ivy has leaves that alternate on the vine, where clematis has them opposite each other.

wisteria is a pretty solid guess for the second one.
 
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My guesses are some sort of clematis for the first one and Carolina jasmine for the second.
 
Rebecca Blake
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Thanks for all the recommendations :)

I didn’t think the first was poison ivy because it seems to be one leaf in three segments rather than three leaves... but then sometimes it is three leaves?

But mostly I was messing with the vine last year and never got a rash. Still doubted myself since I got some rash today.

The second one does kind of seem like wisteria but I don’t ever remember having wisteria flowers in here and I doubt it just magically appeared this year.

I guess I may need to look deeper for something else that may have caused the rash... I suppose some of the dead vines from last year could be?
 
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Years ago I had poison ivy vines that I didn’t know were poison ivy. I actually got poison ivy (or poison something) from time to time but never connected it with those vines. I ran across a drawing of poison ivy that actually proved more helpful than photos. The clincher was that it noted that poison ivy may produce small white berries.  I say “may” only because I don’t know if there are variations in berry color and am too lazy to look up the answer to the question of whether all poison ivy produces white berries and only white berries.

Anyway, the berries told me that this pretty vine that I not only let grow in my cottage garden, but actually watered during drought, was the plant that was making me miserable. I got rid of it and never got poison ivy again.  
 
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For the first, check out peppervine (Nekemias arborea). The second might be trumpet vine. Both are Texas natives.
Here is a photo my peppervine:
20210521_065719.jpg
Baby peppervine
Baby peppervine
 
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I *just* read an article about leaf lobe variations in certain populations of poison ivy, but I don't think that's what you have.
You may find this info sheet on poison ivy from the City of Austin to be helpful-they show a leaf variation but also show a plant that to me looks like what you have- peppervine.

(the second vine, looking at the photo, it sure looks like jasmine in my garden, coming up gangbusters in the spring. Good luck, I've been fighting mine for years and.... I'm not winning.)
 
Rebecca Blake
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I think I have officially decided my first vine is ‘ Clematis Drummondii’ also known as Texas Virgin’s Bower. Once I see flowers I will know for sure.

The second one I’m going to say is definitely not wisteria. I just came across wisteria on Wednesday in flower. The leaves looked different and my plant isn’t flowering right now.

Still wondering what it is though!
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