Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Nut Trees - clay with limestone

 
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in southwest ohio and we have a clay based soil with limestone bedrock. Great for corn, but not so good for some nut trees (like Chestnuts). Black walnut trees and shagbark hickory grow wild here, but I was wondering if I would have any luck with hazelnuts, pine nuts, and/or pecans (or perhaps hicans) with this kind of soil. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I am particularly interested in hazelnuts since I can use them as an understory bush and because they start producing relatively quickly.
 
Posts: 80
Location: NW Mass Zone 4 (5 for optomists)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hazels should be fine. I have awful clay and they are growing well here (butternut, not so much.)
 
Posts: 292
Location: Harrisonburg, VA
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We're straight clay on limestone karst topography setup here in the Shenandoah Valley and there are a plethora of Chestnuts making a comeback with the chinese hybrids. I bought two last year from a grower and his "plantation" thrives in our soil. The squirrels are our problem.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
23
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
although all are babies I have black walnut, carpathian walnut, butternut, hickory nut, sweet chestnut, halls hardy almond and hazelnut all growing on our property which is mostly all clay..the stone here is shale or slate..
 
Posts: 155
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Pecans tend to like lowland areas.

"Upland soils are suitable for pecan trees if they
have at least 3 feet of friable topsoil and a sandy clay
subsoil that allows free penetration of both water and air."

Check the note about PH.

http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/library/hort2/mf1025.pdf
 
It's a beautiful day in this neighborhood - Fred Rogers. Tiny ad:
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!