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Biochar with bokashi

 
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A local shop makes something they call."biokashi". It is basically char mixed into bokashi at the beginning of fermentation. I've had one great experience with it but haven't bought it since (mostly because it was crazy under priced for the first batch and had since been priced more in line with its labor value). What do you all think of that approach?

 Hi S Lowe, There is a book that I have called Terra Preta: How the World's Most Fertile Soil Can Help Reverse Climate Change and Reduce World Hunger and in it the authors speculate that bokashi was made by the indigenous peoples who created the famous Terra Preta soils in South America.  The theory sounds good, but I don't know if it can be proven.  Certainly, the bokashi method, or some other high lactic acid fermentation, would help to neutralize many of the pathogens in human feces and the latter has been proven to be an integral part of that ancient soil building process.  At any rate, this method of using bokashi with biochar might have been popularized by these particular authors.  Most of the youtube links that I found on the subject are from the same nation as the authors: Germany.  It is an interesting theory and might prove to be accurate, but as far as I can tell from the scientists who have been studying the actual soils, there has been no mention of a fermentative agent in the process.  Maybe I missed that in my skimming of the literature.  
 
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:

A local shop makes something they call."biokashi". It is basically char mixed into bokashi at the beginning of fermentation. I've had one great experience with it but haven't bought it since (mostly because it was crazy under priced for the first batch and had since been priced more in line with its labor value). What do you all think of that approach?

 Hi S Lowe, There is a book that I have called Terra Preta: How the World's Most Fertile Soil Can Help Reverse Climate Change and Reduce World Hunger and in it the authors speculate that bokashi was made by the indigenous peoples who created the famous Terra Preta soils in South America.  The theory sounds good, but I don't know if it can be proven.  Certainly, the bokashi method, or some other high lactic acid fermentation, would help to neutralize many of the pathogens in human feces and the latter has been proven to be an integral part of that ancient soil building process.  At any rate, this method of using bokashi with biochar might have been popularized by these particular authors.  Most of the youtube links that I found on the subject are from the same nation as the authors: Germany.  It is an interesting theory and might prove to be accurate, but as far as I can tell from the scientists who have been studying the actual soils, there has been no mention of a fermentative agent in the process.  Maybe I missed that in my skimming of the literature.  


Its possible that he got the idea from that line of research. I always suspected he came up with it because he was regularly making both biochar and bokashi in his shop. Probably experimenting with various forms of inoculation. I'll ask him about it if I make it over to his shop soon
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