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Erosion under Pine and Chestnut forest

 
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Hello from Greece, Arcadia - Zone 8b.

We have moved to the beautiful Skiritida Forest, rich with sweet chesnuts, pine, oaks, and cedar, and firs.  50 metres from our house is a North-facing slope that is steep and showing bad signs of erosion.  Some neighbours suggest chopping the beautiful old pines on the edge and I am resisting. Any feedback to save this magic ledge of the food forest and help restore the eroding land.  We are open to all ideas. Pictures attached.
20201201_133023.jpg
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Location: North Thomas Lake, Manitoba
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Hi Athena, I think that finding the best solution will involve getting a better understanding of the cause. In the meantime, you could seed some deep rooted grasses and or shrubs on the ledge and on the bare soil that has fallen.
 
Athena Lamberis
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Thank you Nick,

We suspect it to be rainfall during the winters. We don't have much info as the house grounds were not occupied for many years. There is an old well above and a 40 degree slope of thickforest above.  There is a slope that faces more East which has been overtaken by Spanish broom which helped with some of the minor mudslides in previous years, we were told. I would like to see what would take root, but perhaps I need to terrace it a bit as it's almost a 90 degree drop.
 
pollinator
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Location: the mountains of western nc
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it looks something like a road cut. is the level area to the left of the eroded slope in the picture a road or something else that needs to stay low and level? it’s so hard to work with such a steep slope that i would want to bring in more material to try to bring the grade of that slope down so it’s less of a cliff, and then work on getting more plants rooting into it...but if you need to get vehicles through there i suppose that wouldn’t be an option.
 
Athena Lamberis
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This is the land infront of the drop, and you can see the house foundation in the distance (to the East that leads to a road, but there is a ravine to the west, so no need for a road . . . so we could certainly terrace so we don't risk loosing these trees.  
land-infront-of-erosion-.jpg
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