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Sundial Lupine Edibility (Lupinus perennis)

 
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A plant entry on the Plants for a Future website for sundial lupine (Lupinus perennis), claims that the seeds of this plant can be eaten if they've been properly leached and soaked thoroughly. https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lupinus+perennis Unfortunately, I cannot verify these claims through any ethobotanical records or foraging accounts. I'm assuming at least one other person on this forum has experimented with perennial lupine seeds to see if the seeds can be made edible with the proper food preparation. I have yet to find any journal article that gives a profile of the alkaloid content of sundial lupine compared to tarhui (Lupinus mutabilis) and other bitter lupines, so I don't know if processing methods for cultivated bitter lupines can be adapted for use on wild sundial lupine seeds.
 
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Lupini beans I guess are quite common as bar fare overseas. Brami is one that I have just recently tried. I also ordered some dried lupini beans to plant this season. Apparently Australia is now planting and harvesting them. The lupines I am familiar with has a seed the size of 1/4  of a pea. The Italian lupini is about the size of a lima bean. The need to leach the alkaloids from the  bean isn't always they same there is an effort to prevent cross pollination in fields. The process for the leaching and fermenting/salting of the lupini beans is covered well on you tube. With that variable of alkaloid content in just that one strain I am not sure that there is a standard profile of its content of it is a variable level in all strains.
 
Ryan M Miller
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I'm refering specifically to the edibility of the seeds of sundial lupine (Lupinus perennis) native to North America. The edibility of other domesticated lupin beans is already well-documented, so I have no need to know about the edibility of domesticated species.
 
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