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Tarwi/chocho cultivation

 
Posts: 55
Location: Oregon
8
forest garden foraging homestead
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Hola desde los estados unidos!

I'm hoping someone here can provide information on the cultivation and consumption of tarwi/tahuri/chocho (lupinus mutabilis). I'm grateful to have received some seeds and excited to trial this traditional crop in my region. I'm interested to learn any common practices for growing them. It looks like direct sowing after the last frost is sufficient, but I'd be curious if seeds are ever soaked or scarified before planting (like is recommended for some lupinus species), if the soil is amended in any way, or anything else related to the growing of this crop.

I've gathered that they are often used in soups and stews after processing (it looks like soaking in at least 3 changes of water over 48 hours is sufficient.) I've also seen a dish where they were pureed. It also looks like perhaps they are pickled and eaten as a snack? I'd love to hear any additional information on processing the tarwi and recipes/common uses.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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Hi, Mathew

I enjoy reading about new plants that I have not heard of.

I hope you will not mind if I share what I found about Lupinus mutabilis.

These are the beans:



Source




Source


The flowers and the plants:



Source


The bone-white seed contains more than 40% protein and 20% fat and has been used as a food by Andean people since ancient times, especially in soups, stews, salads, and by itself mixed with boiled maize.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupinus_mutabilis

Thanks for sharing out these beans.  I hope you have success in planting them.
 
Mathew Trotter
Posts: 55
Location: Oregon
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Assuming these attachments work, here are two cookbooks I managed to glean during my research. Spanish language, but not terrible to translate if your Spanish is rusty or non-existent (also includes amaranth, quinoa, and a few other Andean crops.)

William Whitson at Cultivariable probably has the best English language information I've been able to find.

Also, there are a variety of seed colors, though white is the most common. I was hoping to get a variety of seed colors to work with but all of the ones I received were white-seeded varieties.
Filename: Andean-Recipes-INIAP.pdf
File size: 4 megabytes
Filename: Andean-Recipes-Oxfam.pdf
File size: 8 megabytes
 
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