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Comparison pear and apple tree pests an disease

 
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An interesting contrast on my land is that apples which have been on the farm for over100 years have many more diseases and are plagued by fruit maggots. Whereas pears that were introduced 25 and 10 years ago do not have either problem.  I suspect that the maggot difference may be due to the time that the fruit ripens because the late ripening apple tree has few maggots. On the other hand it is more susceptible to anthrax scabs than the early ripening Gravenstien.  What have others observed with different varieties?
 
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Yeah I agree that ripening time seems to be a big factor for some of the disease issues.

I also wonder if the apple is generally more disease prone because of the "over breeding" that has been done with it, whereas the pear may have more "wild and tough" genetics still.
 
Hans Quistorff
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Steve Thorn wrote:Yeah I agree that ripening time seems to be a big factor for some of the disease issues.

I also wonder if the apple is generally more disease prone because of the "over breeding" that has been done with it, whereas the pear may have more "wild and tough" genetics still.


More likely by over selection for sweetness and then grafting large numbers of genetically identical trees. Asian pears are an example of this in comparison to traditional varieties which historically were planted as pollinating guilds instead of production monocrops.
 
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For NW FL extremely early blooming pears may be more resistant to fire blight in NW Florida.

A tree during a warm winter that blooms in early January may have more resistance.  Many believe that the flowers may be a point of entry for FB infections.  So getting that over by march might be beneficial.   The Hood can bloom as early as the end of december.  

Feb 7, 2021 a pine apple pear.  

 
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