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"Organic" OMRI certified bags of soil

 
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I noticed small bits of red, green, blue plastic in my bags of "Organic" "OMRI certified" soil from the big box store. What it leads me to believe is that the "compost" that they use is the same compost that most cities provide - shredded partially composted material from the city yard waste programs, which includes the trash picked up by the lawn mowers and the herbicides that were sprayed on those plants. It would explain why some people have their seedlings killed when potted in these soils. I have also seen postings that some of these also include small amounts of sewage in them.
So I am wondering if running this material through a composting cycle would be worth the effort.

I am starting to think that just getting shredded trees from arborists and composting that would be better.
 
pollinator
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I had a bit of an issue with bagged composted cow manure a few years ago.  The plants in the bed I used it in were yellow and stunted and I suspected it either had to do with whatever dugs the animals were injected with or whatever the food they consumed was sprayed with.  On the occasion I use manure, I gather and compost it myself from sources that I know are as chemical free as possible.

You could try composting the soil or simply try growing a cover crop in it this year and see how it does.
 
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I know you have to read the labels carefully.  In some places biosludge is considered organic.  Even if you put aside the human waist part, there are antibiotics, and drugs, and all kinds of things we are trying to avoid by growing organic.  It's so sad 😢.
The other day I found an organic compost for 4.00, half what I have been paying.  I looked at the ingredients. Not much info.  It also said not to be used to grow food in the State of California.  Now I know it didn't instantly go bad when it entered the state, so I figured it doesn't meet CA standards. I didn't buy it. Just to risky.
You should be able to trust organic, especially if it's OMRI certified.  It's especially hard for people like me who suck at making compost.  Good luck, be safe, and happy gardening.
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