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Let's talk turkey

 
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I was given five year old supposedly heritage Holland Turkey. They are huge and can not fly up to roost so I think there commercial broad breasted turkeys. They do not have full plumage so I can't tell which are toms and which are hens, any tips? There are supposed to be two. toms which would mean I can get fertalized eggs to hatch out. I've made them a 20x20 temporary pen but don't have enough fencing to put them in a much larger area and they kind of bully my smaller ducks and chickens. Tips advice?
 
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If they are domestic turkeys (white) they are, hands down, the dumbest creatures currently roaming the planet.  You will have to shoo them in when it's raining so that they don't develop hypothermia or drown from staring up, hypnotized, into the falling rain.  If it's hot, you need to make sure they are cool enough or they will literally allow themselves to roast alive.  They are far too stupid to care for themselves.  Think pet rock and you have the idea.  My advice is grow them to a good eating size and be done with them.  
 
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Hollands are a good meat breed.  Toms have a waddle that hang to the side of their face and the hens have a little wattle that sticks up.  If they gobble they are usually toms.  Ours at one year old gobble at every noise they hear.  Ours breed well after they are a year old.   It works best for us to keep them separate from other birds.  Raising the water up higher than chicken waterers also helps keep them healthier.
 
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If they are broad-breasted turkeys they won't be able to breed on their own.  How big are they?  My big heritage tom is maybe 30lbs live weight at a year old.  I've dressed out broad-breasteds at that weight or above by 4-5 months.  A year old broad-breasted tom would likely be 50-70lbs live weight.

Also, at a year old, if you can't distinguish the toms and the hens something is wrong.  With the turkeys I've raised (broad-breasted and heritage) I can usually tell the toms from the hens by a few months.  6 months tops.  Between different plumage and behavior it's usually pretty obvious.  I did have one heritage turkey that I wasn't positive on until slaughter when I found testicles that were about 1/4 the size of a chicken's.  But he was the exception (and I'll point out exceptionally tasty as he put on a glorious fat layer).  

If they really are a year old, and are broad-breasted turkeys, I'd slaughter them as soon as you have time to do so.  A good way to use the massive carcasses like that is to carve off the breast and thigh meat (I leave the skin on, but I do de-bone).  Cure it, then smoke it.  You'll have the most amazing lunch meat ever.  The drumsticks and wings are best braised, but even low and slow on the grill will work.

If they're heritage turkeys then you should be finding eggs by now.  Get an incubator with an automatic egg turner and try hatching them.
 
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