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commercial biochar production?

 
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does anyone know of biochar being sold or made available in bags?
was just thinking out loud, but in county where I am the largest employment is in logging and there are quite a few wood industries and furniture shops around and a whole bunch of em have giant dumpsters for the wood scraps.  an ah ha moment--all those wood scraps being sent to landfill could be converted to biochar----couldnt it?
 
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The only biochar I've seen for sale was prohibitively expensive, so I made my own.
John s
Pdx,or
 
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it could be a grand opportunity with giant dumpsters of bits and pieces of wood at these smallish furniture factories currently going to the landfill
 
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John Suavecito wrote:The only biochar I've seen for sale was prohibitively expensive, so I made my own.
John s
Pdx,or



I make and sell biochar as well and agree with John,
it's indeed prohibitively expensive to buy, especially considering the amount that you need to really turn horrible dirt into decent soil.

For that reason I'm shifting my focus on the feed additive sector, (indoor) biochar stove designing/building and workshops to train people to make their own biochar and I might focus on the lawn-care industry as well. Or high end horticulture.

To answer the OP's question; free feedatock is obviously great but from a commercial perspective you need to have a consistent product so preferably you find a source that always has the same material rather than a furniture maker that uses a different exotic wood every week.

Personally my preference goes towards softwoods when it comes to biochar as a soil amendment.
 
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