• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Mike Haasl
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Kate Downham
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino

Sustainability in Cities

 
pollinator
Posts: 50
Location: Topeka, KS, Zone 6a
72
hugelkultur cat dog trees urban books cooking bee wood heat
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My wife is on a local sustainability board that is looking in ways to increase sustainability in Topeka, KS. I'm on a Community Development Committee that explores ways to grow small business in the community, especially agriculture and horticulture related businesses. The local extension office is currently hosting a program that promotes people learning to grow vegetables and supports community gardens as well. Farmers Markets, CSA's and local Co-ops seem to be increasing, not as fast as we would like to see, but there is forward progress. Personally we keep gardening and increasing our produce production every year. What are some other things people are doing to create sustainability in their local communities? We're very interested other things that are going on in other areas.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11657
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
870
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm impressed by what people are doing in Tucson, AZ to reduce flooding and improve the street environment.

https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/street-runoff-harvesting/tucson-arizona-green-streets-policy/

 
pollinator
Posts: 199
Location: Gulf Islands, Canada
57
hugelkultur cat books medical herbs homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
100% of potable water where I live comes ultimately from rainfall and we lose a lot due to runoff (small rocky island) as well as having a summer seasonal drought most years. Our local government offers subsidized rain barrels and lots of education on how to effectively collect water, build drought-tolerant and rain-collecting gardens, etc.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3489
Location: Toronto, Ontario
463
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Farming enterpreneurs in Toronto have taken to advertising for people's unused gardens to grow food, in exchange for some produce as rent. Perhaps there's room for the municipality to act as a facilitator.

Looking at the waste stream might yield some answers. What happens to food waste, both household and commercial? Could it be upgraded to feed through use of insect digestion? Could it be fed to crickets to feed the pet food or burgeoning entomophagy industry? Could some combination be used in a staged setup, contained within a shipping container or parked trailer behind a grocery store, that turns daily food waste into several types of insect for chicken/pig feed, with worms at the end of it, for worm castings as a final saleable end-product?

In an ideal world, the chickens and pigs would live behind the grocery store, rotated daily in paddocks and fed food scraps directly, but insects take up less space, make less of a mess, and are easier to dispose of at harvest. All that is needed is a section of compartment where adults would be encouraged to congregate that just so happens to freeze at need, killing the occupants for easy bagging.

-CK
 
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1126
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Your biggest asset right now is that you can manage the Farmers Markets, CSA's and Co-Ops before they get out of hand.

This seems odd, until you realize that here in Maine, we almost have too much of a good thing. With so many areas having farmers markets, and so many small farms trying to get into them, the market has been saturated.

You are in a good position now to plan and control growth in these markets so that the food available is diverse for customers. It does no one any good to have 6 farms producing eggs at the same farmers market, and lowering prices so that their eggs sell over the next farm. And likewise with egg plant and any other food sold at these venues.

Here, when farmers could not get into a farmers market in one town on say Thursday, or were told they had to only bring this or that produce to the farmers market to eliminate the price lowering I mentioned before, they would just go to the next town and start a new farmer's market on Wednesday. If you can control that nonsense, and let farmers see they are just self-defeating themselves by doing that sort of thing, it will go a long way so that farmers, the farmers market itself, and customers; all make out better.

Another thing you should plan and try and implment, if they are not available now, is winter farmers markets. By bringing in those with greenhouses, you can get a year long system of fresh food to consumers if you can manage it right.
 
Posts: 23
6
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Travis Johnson wrote:

Another thing you should plan and try and implment, if they are not available now, is winter farmers markets. By bringing in those with greenhouses, you can get a year long system of fresh food to consumers if you can manage it right.



Bumping this old thread because yes, winter CSAs are amazing. Ours barely relies on greenhouses: it's mostly root vegetables, microgreens, apples and winter squashes, dried legumes, etc. So very sustainable.

Another very healthy thing in our community is an healthy bartering/used goods market. What started as a "mother's group" on Facebook has grown into a huge sharing place where things get shared, given away, or sold. That's where meal trains get organized for struggling families, impromptu food co-ops get formed ("I'm getting a side of beef ordered. Who would like to share it with me?"), equipment gets loaned ("my basement has flooded. Does anyone have a ShopVac I could borrow).

This makes me more confident in the resilience of our community to major changes. It's not something you can force, but you can support such community initiatives by recognizing the validity of informal networks and making community spaces available at no cost for "clothing swaps" or "mommy support groups" for instance.

You can also advocate for mixed neighbourhoods, local businesses and good public schools. I think the reason our community works is that there is a very healthy mix of economical, political and cultural backgrounds, united by the desire of raising healthy families. We all truly LIVE in our small neighbourhood; many of us even work within it.
 
I don't even know how to spell CIA. But this tiny ad does:
2020 work trades for PDC, PTJ and/or SKIP
https://permies.com/t/work-trades-2020
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!