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Rainwater Sand Cistern

 
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Does anybody have experience with this.  It is a bit like a recharge well, except it is using sand and gravel as a filter and storage medium.

LINK TO VIDEOS:

https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLm9ZYFBOtDiR-QFGbSrOeztaSMfowMhbH

Could this work in the desert?  Can you just run the water through a filter to make it potable?

Give me your feedback.

Thanks!
Charlie (Chihuahua Desert)
 
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Thanks for posting this. I've only skimmed a few segments of the video series to get a feel for what they're doing and will download for later viewing. This looks like an option for me to store some water and not have it as vulnerable to freezing in the fall. It looks complex, but logical.
 
Charlie Terry
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Here are a couple of photos.  It would be very easy to divert runoff from roof and surrounding terrain into the sand cistern.
132D9745-B734-41F3-9ED6-DC1DB75A9220.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 132D9745-B734-41F3-9ED6-DC1DB75A9220.jpeg]
F22945A6-D018-4458-A6A3-9760093E31DE.jpeg
[Thumbnail for F22945A6-D018-4458-A6A3-9760093E31DE.jpeg]
 
Michael Helmersson
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Charlie Terry wrote:Here are a couple of photos.  It would be very easy to divert runoff from roof and surrounding terrain into the sand cistern.



Sorry, I forgot to say welcome to Permies. Welcome to Permies.
 
Charlie Terry
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Thanks!
 
pollinator
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I have seen a similar system where instead of sand, plastic interlocking crates were used.
Human safe plastic was used.
So no need to think it will harm humans, because the captured water I encourage people to drink.
But for irrigation its not an issue.

Thinking laterally course rocks or gravel, empty glass bottles [ handled carefully so they are not broken during establishment could be used.]
can you think of any other product?
 
Charlie Terry
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I did a small test of water displacement in sand.  I used a 1 gallon container packed and filled with sand.  I was able to add just shy of a 1/2 gallon of water.

Therefore, if you create a sand cistern with a volume of 1,000 gallons, you can store about 450 gallons of water.  

The cool thing is that the water gets filtered.  No worries about bird poop, dust, bugs, rodents, or other debris getting into your water.
 
John C Daley
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If you install first flush units etc thats better.
Using the sand as a filter will cause a build up of unpleasant matter within the sand pile.
 
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John C Daley wrote:I have seen a similar system where instead of sand, plastic interlocking crates were used.
Human safe plastic was used.
So no need to think it will harm humans, because the captured water I encourage people to drink.
But for irrigation its not an issue.

Thinking laterally course rocks or gravel, empty glass bottles [ handled carefully so they are not broken during establishment could be used.]
can you think of any other product?



Inverted buckets, with slots cut in them, or barrels.
The glass bottles could be the best, they would be free.
A single slot cut in one end or, grind them to sand in a tumbler.
 
Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana. Steve flies like a tiny ad:
3 Plant Types You Need to Know: Perennial, Biennial, and Annual
https://permies.com/t/96847/Pros-cons-perennial-biennial-annual
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