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Co-inhabiting wild life!

 
Posts: 60
Location: Australia
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G`day all,

So I have my Lizards, who eat my slugs, and manage low level pest management,
I have my spiders for the trees and shrubs,

But right now the issue is my currawongs,
They have had a fledgling leave the nest and is building up its strength,
They have become extremely bad of late, they have been aggressive to the lizards, who come near the Fledgling,
Before that they were stealing from neighbours for nesting materials,
They have been stealing bread from shops within 2km.
They have been aggressive towards people who are not from my family.

They have many benefits, they keep away cockatoos, and kill neighbours rats, they do good pest management, often they add resources to the garden!

I have been soft on them lately and given them space but if this bad if they continue to act badly, I am not sure If I should get rid of them and replace them with another group of wild birds, or try and teach them to behave?

Any advice would be great on how to sort them out?



 
pollinator
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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From Wikipedia they seem to be as bad as humans

During the breeding season, pied currawongs will pair up and become territorial, defending both nesting and feeding areas.

However, they are seen as beneficial in forestry as they consume phasmids, and also in agriculture for eating cocoons of the codling moth.
The pied currawong is an omnivorous and opportunistic feeder, eating fruit and berries as well as preying on many invertebrates, and smaller vertebrates, mostly juvenile birds and bird eggs, although they may take healthy adult birds up to the size of a Crested Pigeon on occasion. They will hunt in trees, snatching birds and eggs from nests, as well as insects and berries from trees.
They also hunt in the air and on the ground
Insects predominate in the diet during summer months, and fruit during the winter. They will often scavenge, eating scraps and rubbish and can be quite bold when seeking food from people.
Beetles and ants are the most common types of insects consumed. Pied currawongs have been recorded taking mice, as well as chickens and turkeys from farms.

[48] The pied currawong consumes fruit, including a wide variety of figs, such as the Moreton Bay  watkinsiana),[49] as well as lillypillies  
Other fruit is also sought after, and currawongs have been known to raid orchards, eating apples, pears, strawberries, grapes, stone fruit, citrus, and corn

Pied currawongs have been responsible for the spread of the invasive ornamental Asparagus aethiopicus (often called A. densiflorus) in the Sydney area, the weedy privet species Ligustrum lucidum and L. sinense, and firethorn species Pyracantha angustifolia and P. rogersiana around Armidale.

I dont think you will get rid of them easily. Could you run wires or rope across areas to reduce them flying down?

 
Alex Moffitt
Posts: 60
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Hey,

Thank you so much for the volume of information.

There behaviour problems have been solved! We slowly built up their comfort and moved moved closer to the fledgling, we also encouraged the fledgling to move away from the lizards main sunning spots.

We used fresh wood chips, and a make shift bird bath, to do so!

I believe that if an animal wants to be around you they will be around you!
 
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