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Fall plantings in Oregon  RSS feed

 
d murphy schmidt
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I just joined.........so glad I did! We have 70 acres in the foothills of the Coast Range SW of Dallas, Oregon. Mostly forest, but some pasture and other land we can plant. Well currently with very little water, but 3 creeks and 2 ponds. Looking to make things more permie. Any recommendations for fall plantings in this area. We are in a sort of micro-climate in our immediate area and pocket cold and wet weather (yes, more than the surrounding area). A mile down the road our garden, fruit trees, and berry bushes thrived. We have been here since 1988 and are still struggling to find what works. And we have hungry deer. Lots of hungry deer. And bunnies, bear, etc. There is an old stand of chestnuts, for example, that if we manage to beat the squirrels we don't always beat the bear to them. Anyway - ideas?
 
Kevin MacBearach
Posts: 213
Location: Beavercreek, Oregon
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I'd be interested in know more about fall planting as well. I'm in Beavercreek Oregon, just southeast of Oregon City. I just have a few acres so I'm started to do hugelkulture beds around the property and cutting down and thinning out some trees. I can't imagine dealing with 70 acres though. I'm interested in finding a source for seeds to make a mix of stuff for this area. Have you investigated seeds much?

Kevin
 
John Polk
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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For a great variety of hard to find seeds, try http://jlhudsonseeds.net/

His prices are hard to beat.
Make certain to request a printed catalog. It's like a good reference book. Very informative.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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opposite side of the country but very similar situation here..with the bear, the deer, big birds that eat everything..etc..and we have either too wet or too dry or too hot or too cold.

when you start your baby trees you really gotta protect them..pick up anything you can wrap around them in a cylinder until they are big enough to survive on their own, generally the first 5 years...if you want to save your investment.

another thing is to try to start your baby trees in a hedge of protector trees, like maybe some alders, aspens, etc..that the deer will prefer..and block the deer from reaching the more valuable trees..I have an apple tree that grew out of the roots of a clump of alders..was so well protected by the alders that I didn't even know it was there until it bloomed and bore fruit one year..that year I pruned the alders out from around it and it grew like wildfire that year once it had more light !!

a fruiting hedge is helpful in that area..planting a lot of protector plants with your special trees deep inside the hedges..but still remember to protect at least the lower trunks from rabbits and mice with at least some wire or cardboard wraps the first several years.
 
Eric Toensmeier
Author
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The first step for me is always thinking about water and fencing. I've planted the many trees without thinking those 2 things through and lost more of my babies than I care to think about. Have you installed a rainwater harvesting or drip irrigation system? Do you have a good fence to keep out wildlife, or have used tree tubes or an outdoor dog with invisible electric fence?

Typically I have much better success transplanting in early spring when plants are dormant. I'm not sure that here in Massachusetts they get much of a jump from fall planting. On the other hand, sometimes you just have to plant when you have the time, and spring is typically the worst time. There are some things that must be fall planted, including some of your excellent edible native bulbs like camass. Camass bulbs can be purchased wholesale at very good prices from places like The Bulb Lady and Van Engelen. Their minimum orders are high so you may want to divide them up with a friend. Camass bulbs want to be planted somewhere that is wet in spring but can dry out during the summer. If it is colder and wetter than typical for your area, I'd look at colder wetter climates to the North a bit and see what they can grow. If chestnuts do well Hazel's might also be a good choice. If
 
Kevin MacBearach
Posts: 213
Location: Beavercreek, Oregon
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Thanks Jon. I just ordered the catalog.
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
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Location: Portugal Zone 9 Mediterranean Climate
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Eric Toensmeier wrote:The first step for me is always thinking about water and fencing. I've planted the many trees without thinking those 2 things through and lost more of my babies than I care to think about. Do you have a good fence to keep out wildlife, or have used tree tubes or an outdoor dog with invisible electric fence?



Eric - have you discovered bone sauce yet? It's an old recipe shared by sepp holzer using bones to make a treatment that you can paint onto trees to keep critters at bay.

I've been experimenting and though it's early days, I've been recording all progress here.
 
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