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planting several varieties of edible perennials

 
Cal Burns
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This year I'm focusing more on planting edible perennial plants in my beds that will do well in drought conditions here in Texas. Have some malabar spinach, several herbs. The malabar has done ok, just slow growing.
Looking to plant some New Zealand spinach and Huzantle spinach close to the malabar.
Would it be best to plant in separate locations or is there no chance of them cross pollinating?
Other than asparagus, any other ideas for veggies or edibles that would do well in drought conditions that come back every year?
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
Posts: 1321
Location: northern California
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Are you far enough south that malabar spinach comes back every year? From its roots, or from seeds? If it's coming back from the roots, and if things like citrus and avocadoes grow around you, there is a whole suite of potentially perennial greens and vegetables you can consider.....surinam spinach (Talinum), chaya, moringa come first to mind....
 
Cal Burns
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Alder Burns wrote:Are you far enough south that malabar spinach comes back every year? From its roots, or from seeds? If it's coming back from the roots, and if things like citrus and avocadoes grow around you, there is a whole suite of potentially perennial greens and vegetables you can consider.....surinam spinach (Talinum), chaya, moringa come first to mind....

Malabar is growing well. Has seed pods on them. We get into the 20s on occasion in the winter so not sure it'll come back but will mulch well around it.
 
Leila Rich
steward
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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As far as I can see, the three are from different families and there is no possibility of cross-pollination.
Common names can be really unhelpful
 
Cal Burns
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Thanks Leila. Just tracking back to look at old posts.
The malabar all died back. Will see if any grows back from seed that fell.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I have had good success with Elephant Garlic, a leek, which will survive extreme drought here.

 
Alder Burns
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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I'm also aware of several spineless or near-spineless varieties of prickly pear, which make good vegetables simply sliced and cooked as one would green beans. Some are frost tender, but then you just pull up the plants and break them into segments and store in a box indoors for the winter.....you can then eat off this storage also. Come spring you stick them in base down in the garden and let them do their thing. Also, the stout, succulent stalks of the Surinam spinach (Talinum) can be trimmed of all leaves and similarly stored for the winter.....at least the brief Georgia winter....
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Here is a list for you, http://perennialvegetables.org/perennial-vegetables-for-each-climate-type/mediterranean-and-mild-subtropical/
Tell us how they turn out for you. You might be able to check out waer sensitivity for each plant at practical plant, even then I would take it with a grain of salt, but advise is to find a vendor that lives in a low water environment NATIVESEED might be a place to visit. I also count self-seeding annuals as perennials.
 
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