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Planting veggies into a cover crop

 
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Or undersowing a cover crop beneath your vegetables. Who does this? Is this a thing?

I have heard of undersowing clover beneath tomatoes. That makes sense. Tomatoes are tall. Clover is shorter, covers the ground, and fixes nitrogen.

Should I plant clover beneath my squash? or corn? Why or why not?

Why not just keep clover on my field all the time, and transplant into it?
 
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Don't have the answer, but just here to say I'm very curious to find out as well! I have a big bag of clover, and a brand new veggie bed that has time to sit over Autumn and Winter. Unless there's a definite no answer from someone, I may just give it a go in this bed and see what happens...for science!
 
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This thread was linked in the similar threads section which may be of help:

https://permies.com/t/37700/growing-nitrogen-fixing-cover-crop

From a quick read-through it looks to be a good thing to do as long as the plants going into it have a head start. So may work better with plants being transplanted in vs directly sown? Or when ready to plant in it, just really aggressively chop n' drop the clover?
 
gardener
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There are many types of clovers but I assume you are talking about the low growing dutch white clover maybe?  White clover is perennial in zone 6, especially in moist area. Over time you will find them slowly growing into a dense clover mat. It is actually desirable for garden path as it takes foot traffic well. But for garden beds, you will need extra work to cut out holes or trenches for transplants.
 
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I am currently considering this same thing. Haven't decided for or against yet. I would add one thing against to the discussion: It would be harder to see any weeds, so those will be bigger when you find them; thus harder to remove.
 
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Getting Clover and Growing Squash Attractive characteristics that may exist.
I highly recommend the below method for three main reasons:

1) It rises organic matter and soil fertility.

2) It usually requires far less weeding (both tractor and hand) than other methodologies we've attempted; and,

3) It 'cleans up' the field in preparation for subsequent crops.
 
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I bought a 50 lb bag of dutch white clover.  I plan on spreading it on the paths between my fruit trees and on my raised beds.  Will do this late in the fall since our winters are getting shorter.
 
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