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Identify a wild fruit tree.

 
Tom Chapman
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I live in Houston. In the woods near my house there are two tall fruit trees that are dropping fruit now (October 1st). The fruits are spheres 1.25 inches across and orange red in color. The trees have grown in the middle of the forest and are tall and thin. Attached is the best picture I could get of leaves. I also have a picture of the fruit. There are several seeds in each fruit. They are hard and thin. (See picture.)

What kind of tree is this? From a "help the local wildlife" standpoint I would like to plant some of the seeds of this tree. Is this a good idea? Any hints on the bast way to plant these seeds.
Photo Oct 01, 2 47 15 PM.jpg
[Thumbnail for Photo Oct 01, 2 47 15 PM.jpg]
Tree leaves.
Photo Oct 01, 3 08 41 PM.jpg
[Thumbnail for Photo Oct 01, 3 08 41 PM.jpg]
Fruits
Photo Oct 01, 4 15 30 PM.jpg
[Thumbnail for Photo Oct 01, 4 15 30 PM.jpg]
Seeds
 
Tyler Ludens
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American persimmon http://www.eattheweeds.com/persimmons-pure-pucker-power-2/
 
Tom Chapman
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Thank you sir. I appreciate your time.
 
Brenda Groth
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i planted some whips but they didn't get leaves..however..the wood was still green under the bark..so..I'm waiting??
 
Cris Bessette
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Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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I know I'm responding to an old post. By coincidence I just made two quarts of persimmon freezer jam yesterday with American persimmons (Diospyros Virginiana)
One of my favorite wild fruit.


 
edwin lake
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Cris Bessette wrote:I know I'm responding to an old post. By coincidence I just made two quarts of persimmon freezer jam yesterday with American persimmons (Diospyros Virginiana)
One of my favorite wild fruit.




I have a lot of persimmons around my house and I enjoy eating them when they are ripe. However, I tried to make some jam and it seemed very time consuming to remove the seeds manually. Is there an easy way?
 
Cris Bessette
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The best way I have found to remove the seeds is to use a kitchen strainer.

I use a plastic strainer with holes that are a bit smaller than the seeds, (but not too much smaller or it is too hard to get the pulp through)

First I put the strainer on a large bowel, pot, crockpot,etc. , one large enough for the strainer to sit on top.
Then I fill it maybe halfway with fruit.
I've tried different ways to squish the pulp through, but the best way I've found so far is to put my hand in a small plastic container, like a sour cream container.
Then basically just smash and squish the fruit through the strainer using the bottom of the small plastic container. I used to use my bare hand or a soup bowl to
push the pulp through, but it was so messy and sticky and pulp would end up all over the place.


The majority of the skins and seeds will stay in the strainer and the pot underneath fills with pulp. Pick out any seeds, etc. that got through.

A simple recipe for freezer jam:
(2) quarts persimmon pulp
(1) cup sugar
(1) cup orange juice



Put on low heat and let it heat to the point where it is starting to bubble, stirring every few minutes.

Store in small containers in the freezer. I use it like apple butter.

I use mine directly out of the freezer, but some should keep in the refrigerator for a 2-3 weeks at least.





 
Glenn Underhill
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Location: NW Montana
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Have you tried the Victorio strainer? Last time I made raspberry jelly I used the kitchen strainer method to remove most of the seeds and so I decided to get the Victorio before I made it again. You can get different sized screens and people seem to like it. I haven't gotten one yet, I forgot to put it on my Christmas list!
 
Cris Bessette
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That strainer looks good, though for the $50 it costs I think I will stick to my caveman method for now

I'll keep that in mind though for the future when some of my other fruit bearing plants start producing.
 
Glenn Underhill
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Cris Bessette wrote:...though for the $50 it costs I think I will stick to my caveman method for now


lol, yes, that's why I should have put it on my Christmas list! I've wanted one for years but could never spend the $50!
 
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