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100% Organic Soil Blocks?  RSS feed

 
Chris Watson
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Location: North of Detroit (5b to 6a)
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I'm very interested in making soil blocks next year, but every recipe for soil I see has at least one laboratory-made ingredient (lime, colloidial phosphate, etc.) Does anyone have a recipe for a fully organic planting medium?
 
Craig Dobbson
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Location: Maine (zone 5)
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Maybe a mix like this one : http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-6152-johnnys-512-mix-og-20-quarts.aspx

it's made to be used with their soil blockers.
 
Chris Watson
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Location: North of Detroit (5b to 6a)
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I'm sure that's an excellent product, but it'll get pricey in a hurry when I'm preparing for spring planting. What can I prepare myself using soil, my own compost, and just a few purchases (perlite, greensand, etc.)
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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we do ours with compost, sand, vermicompost, peat moss, and a bit of wood ash.

http://www.velacreations.com/food/plants/annuals/item/32-soil-blocks.html
 
Andrew Ray
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Location: Slovakia
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I wouldn't consider lime a laboratory made ingredient. Agricultural lime is just finely crushed limestone. Otherwise the lime used in building and masonry is ground limestone that has been processed at high heat to produce CaO.
 
Abe Connally
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you can skip the lime and use wood ash, but you need to test a sample of your mix first, to determine if you need ph adjustment (lime) anyway.
 
Chris Kott
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
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I am unfamiliar with soil blocks. I am guessing you grow things in them? I am familiar with compressed earth blocks, but what little I have read here suggests completely different concerns, materials, and usage. What have I missed?

-CK
 
Andrew Ray
Posts: 165
Location: Slovakia
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Soil blocks are used for starting seedlings:
http://www.pottingblocks.com/soil_block_for_beginners/
(I'm not giving any sort of commercial endorsement for this site, just it has good information on the basics of soil blocks).
 
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