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What is the English Term for these boards ?

 
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Hi,

I am Dutch, we call these SchaalDelen... 'ShellParts'
what are these boards called in English?

thanks!

Jasper
schaaldelen.jpg
[Thumbnail for schaaldelen.jpg]
 
steward
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Shell parts?

Would that be "siding"?
As in the siding (shell) that covers the framing of a structure?

 
Jasper Middelberg
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'schaal' is also translated as 'scales',
'schaaldelen' is a specific term for boards with bark edges,

and yes we use it for sheds, wall siding and even roof decking..

Can you call them rough boards? I think this is a more general term. ..?
 
John Polk
steward
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Like 'shingles'...(gordelroos) ?

Siding - 'scales'

I don't know if there is a proper term in English for siding with the bark left on.
It is often used on sheds, chicken coops, etc. Gets the job done without the expense of extra milling.
If the bark is on the flat surface, it would be 'slabs'.
Perhaps 'rough siding'.

According to Google, rough siding = ruwe platen.

 
Jasper Middelberg
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haha, scales, eehmm and
in ruwe platen... platen = sheets

rough siding sounds good for now,
thanks,

and wow, an oppertunity to create a new word,
what about:

BARKBOARDS

.... catchy

 
pollinator
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In western canada they are often used for livestock shelter windbreaks. Around here they are called windboard, or second-cut slabs.

Here 'rough lumber' is used to describe dimensional lumber that hasn't been put through a planer...ie a full 2X6 not 1 1/2 by 5 1/2.
 
Jasper Middelberg
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ah,
second-cut-slabs, that hits what it is!



thanks again!
 
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Hello Jasper,

There is several vernacular terms for this, and as a timber wright, I use them all the time. Some are regional terms, but most in the traditional/historic building/architecture profession, know the material as:

"Live edge Fletch or board,"

"Log Fletche,"

"Adirondack board or siding"

There are a few more but rarely used and very region specific.

Hope that helps.

Regards,

Jay
 
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Location: SW Missouri
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Jasper if you are looking for the English version rather than the US English, then they are called waney-edged boards.
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Hi Graham,

I find the description "Waney-edged," "Wave Slab" and "Bark Edge," board to be one of the regional specific vernacular descriptions that I spoke about earlier. In England, Scotland and most of Europe, in my experience, (I could be off a tad because it has been awhile,) use the expression "Wane Fletch" or "Wane Board," not "Waney-edged board." I would like to know your reference?

Regards,

Jay
 
Graham Bunting
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Jay, I'm originally from England and that is what we called it. You're right in that it may be a regional thing, but I lived in the south west and my dad, a carpenter, was from the north and called it the same thing.
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Thanks Graham,

We have had different experiences but that is good to know. I was just speaking to a timber wright in Churchtown Sebergham, Cumbria, (hope I have that correct,) and they used "wave fletch," so this localized vernacular, could be occurring on both sides of the "pond."

Regards,

Jay
 
Graham Bunting
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lol there is nothing more mysterious than the English language. I work in am elementary school and have fun with it every day.
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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My wife and I both have been teachers at one time or another. My son the other day asked why "English," seems to be the language spoken around the world. I said, " for one reason, it is such a marvelous language made up of so many other languages, and it just keeps on evolving. Also, we have many words of, varying complexity, to describe such a simple thing as an emotion." Now you and I are seeing that applied to such a simple thing as a piece of wood that has it's bark still on it. WOW
 
Graham Bunting
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The kids were giving me a hard time one day about some of the ways I pronounce words. We are talking English redneck vs Missouri rednecks. I wrote a simple paragraph on the board in my local accent. I might as well have been writing Welsh as far as they were concerned. It was fun watching them try to decipher it.
 
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Slab
 
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the english call this wainy edge timber.. they use it for siding have seen it used here in North Carolina as siding for homes fences and such.. as the wood dries a lot of the bark falls off .. some stays attached..

makes for a very striking siding or fencing
 
steward
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flat sawn, live edge would be what I am used to.
 
gardener
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Slab in my neck of the woods or slab siding.
 
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Flitch Cut - been milling those for years. Bad Goat Forest Products, Missoula, Montana
 
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