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Richard Knapp
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Hey All,

This link is to my blog which documents in detail (photos and text) the process of building a green barn: http://www.centralmissourigrainsforfood.com

Richard
 
John Redman
Posts: 196
Location: Perkinston Mississippi zone 9a
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Looks like a mighty fine place to hang out. Your going to love the radiant floor.
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Wow , nice place Richard. Is one of your tractors a fordson?
 
Richard Knapp
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Thanks for the poz reinforcement. The tractor is a Ferguson TO20. Not much but will pull a 2 bottom plow through the silt soil out there.

The land is about 5 acres of creek bottom on the Black Branch of Perche Creek - a tributary of the Missouri.

Anybody have experience building up a silt soil?

Richard
 
Chris Kott
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
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Something I wish everyone would try is to take a little space, or a few tiny ones scattered around, and try biochar out in different soil conditions and record the results. What are the concerns with silt? Not enough organic matter?

-CK
 
Richard Knapp
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Yes, not enough organic matter but also no sand and no clay. When it gets very wet, it is like quicksand. Holds the water and turns to jelly. Richard
 
Chris Kott
Posts: 836
Location: Toronto, Ontario
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Well you made mention of the fact that the burned-over areas did well. By that token, I'd either try select burns, or again, check out biochar, and try mixing that stuff in to your soil. If you don't know what terra preta is, check it out. I think it was the Aztecs that used biochar to improve their soil, which was usually only inches thick, and their tropical climate caused the soil to burn out quickly. I would guess that its air-retention properties would take care of your air and structure problem, though.

-CK
 
Richard Knapp
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Chris,

I'm trying biochar in my greenhouse - wood ash and charcoal from my wood stoves at home. Should have some feedback this season. The soil is the same as outside. Richard
 
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