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producting fireproof construciton materials  RSS feed

 
Tyrr Vangeel
Posts: 39
Location: Mol, Belgium
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I am living in an area with no clay available.
As I am not willing yet to pay for it, I would like to find a way arround it, or to substrackt clay from the sand (which was suggested in an article somewhere).

In the PDC DVD, the use of eggshells is mentioned to creat quicklime, with which you can make cement.

Has anyone any experience starting from skratch (or less) to build something?
I live in a pure sand soil area with some small creeks (the most likely place to get something). The problem with them is that it is all private land and I don't expect the owners to be open for this 'radical' and 'green' thinking and experimenting.

If I can wash clay/loam from sand, I think I can try the make our ground water pump run on solar power and put the water back into the groundwater (if there is no pollution which I am not willing to accept in exchange for clay) fairly easy (we have close to zero runoff, even without swales.

If I can produce my own cement, does anyone knows if it is possible to make fire resistant cement yourself?
I have eggshells (for lime?) and white sands at hand aswell as some other stuff that might be usefull, but I don't know what I'll need.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1359
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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You could build a sandbag house.
If you really waned you could sew your own bags and then fill them with sand and lay them like "bricks".
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Tyrr,

Not to be negative, but no there really isn't. Lime and cement are really different. Portland, (cement,) is big industry and not very ecological of sustainable. Lime is something you could make, but the labor involved is extensive. Check out: http://virginialimeworks.com/ to give you an idea. They "earth bag," concept is probably the lowest impact way you could go, other than some traditional building method know to your area. I practice and teach vernacular folk architecture, and it is usually the best way to go for any given area.

Good Luck,
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