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Any benefits to bokashi?

 
Henry N. Lawrence Iii
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What is the need or benefit of bokashi being added to a hugleculture pile or pit.
 
Adrien Lapointe
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What is bokashi?
 
John Polk
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In the "Composting" forum there is a good thread (several pages) about bokashi:

http://www.permies.com/forums/posts/list/11246#102994

 
Paygh Stedman
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garrett lacey
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Location: Edmonton Alberta
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There is no need to add bokashi compost to a hugel bed.
But if you were to build the bed so you could bury finished bokashi in it, I suspect the wood in the pile would decompose slightly faster. Or perhaps you could dress up the woodpile with bokashi in place of other compost or manure before adding the soil layer. The key with bokashi i guess is that you're burying it. If you want added nutrition in an area, then bury it there.

edit
Just thought of this.. as bokashi is rather bacterial whereas the idea of Hugelkultur is fungal decomposition. Generally, I think you're going for one type of decomposition or the other.
 
S Bengi
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Biotic soil components

Typical number or length
(in one handful of soil)

Typical biomass
(pounds/acre)



Plant roots
Plant residues (both roots and shoots) are the ultimate source of almost all carbon (energy) for soil organisms
There may be 1,000 times more soil microorganisms near plant roots than in soil further away from roots
60 – 150 inches
(annual crops)
1,500 – 3,000 inches
(perennial grasses)
3,000
(annual crops)
15,000
(perennial grasses)

Bacteria
Along with fungi, are the most important group in organic matter decomposition
Extracellular compounds help bind soil particles into aggregates
Specialized groups are involved in each portion of the nitrogen cycle
300 million – 50 billion
400 – 4,000

Fungi
The most important group involved in decomposing resistant compounds such as lignin
Hyphae grow extensively through soils, helping bind soil particles in aggregates
Some specialized fungi grow symbiotically with plant roots, increasing nutrient and water uptake and decreasing disease incidence
500,000 – 100 million
500 – 5,000

Actinomycetes
Type of bacteria with growth form similar to fungi; functions similar to both
Produce compounds that give soil its distinctive aroma
100 million – 2 billion
400 – 4,000

Nematodes
Are the most numerous animals in the soil
Help accelerate decomposition when they graze on bacteria, fungi and plant residues
1,000 – 10,000
5 – 50

Protozoa
Help accelerate decomposition when they graze on bacteria, fungi and plant residues
100,000 – 50 million
5 – 100

Arthropods
Help accelerate decomposition when they (mites, collembolan and other insects) graze on bacteria, fungi and plant residues
Collembola, shown in this photograph, are an important arthropod in plant residue decomposition
100 – 1,000
1 – 10

Earthworms
Burrowing activity mixes soils and creates macropores that increase water infiltration and flow and help aerate soil
Soil passage through guts increases aggregation and nutrient cycling
0 – 2
10 – 40
 
Michael Fine
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I think it can't harm... There's no such think as too much diversity of life in the soil as far as I'm concerned
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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