• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Trees to dry out soil

 
Wojtek Kaczmarek
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi guys!
I am new on forum so welcome to all of you.
I have situation where my house is standing on neighbour border and i cannot simply make a drainage to dry out soil there as to building where i live water is coming from bottom (through foundations) to room on north side.
Therefore i am looking for trees with long enough roots to penetrate soil to dry it out.
Theres populous species which have such root system but theres problem that the roots are strong enough to damage foundations (as i heard).
Soil near my building is sandy rather poor. I have to plant trees on west side to reach north side of house. Do you have any experience with this kind of situation any advice?
All the best
Wojtek
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dig a pond in your back yard the water will drain there instead.
You could then use a plastic pond liner to cover your foundation area and then cover the pond liner with 2 inch of sand/grass/turf.
Your neighbor will love the turf/grass/flower, vs complaining.
 
K Nelfson
Posts: 129
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

My understanding is that tree roots are not very deep. Also, some species are tolerant of wet feet but do not thrive in chronically saturated soils. Willows are said to be good for drying soil but I'm not so sure. There are many plants that thrive in bogs and most of them are not trees. Gardenweb would be a good place to start. I read several informative threads there when I was looking for an acreage.
 
Jeff McLeod
Posts: 95
Location: New Hampshire
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Probably one of those old folk tales ... but I was always under the impression that weeping willows usually take care of wet soil situations. Not sure if you have a septic with leach field but beware if you do. Roots can do plenty of harm to both.
 
Wojtek Kaczmarek
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for answers guys.
Soils are rather dry and sandy here, but in winter theres lot of rains snow and moisture.

darmowy hosting obrazków/></a>

"Water" means that moisture is coming into building from this side.


About the pond i am sceptical as i need to dry area where i have not access. Will the pond dry out part from north side?

Salix species - that can be tricky here as i do not see them in area as wild trees so i do not know that they will grow easily on these soils.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
8
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok a few other idea.
you could add dirt to the fence line effectively creating a ditch and then you could have the "ditch" lead to the pond.
You could also offer make an offer to the owner next door to plant them a garden like the one you have.
And they will have all the vegetables and fruits they want, make sure you have a non-crazy garden and that you share with them.
Then once they say YES to the offer you can then do the ditch thing with it flowing into your pond so that they are not worried about it going in their basement.

You could just skip all this and be upfront with them and even offer cash/free lawn mowing(compost for you)/vegetables for them to let you build the ditch.
If they recently added soil to there yard causing this "new" flooding you could let them know that your insurance company is going to come after them.
So they should just let you do the ditch and avoid all the complication.

So, let them know that the extra water will not be going in their basement but in the pond.
Let them know that if your house have damage they may be legally responsible and that you can help them avoid that.
Let them know that there is money/food/free service in it for them.

I really dont see why they would say no, unless you guys have a super bad history.
Just work your way up to it and ask. Maybe at a holiday/easter/party/cookout/few beers.
They are only human "RIGHT"?
 
Robert Ray
gardener
Posts: 1350
Location: Cascades of Oregon
12
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome, have you considered the use of a french tile drain in addition to plants to address the water problem?
 
Wojtek Kaczmarek
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks guys, i am aprreciated for your help.
Your answers gave me an idea to make connection from the french drain situated near foundations and which will cover few meters fence lenght to the pond. Situated in area where compost pile is placed now.
When spring will come i will start to dry out foundations (by digging soil for 60cm depth) and make some waterproof insulation on them. Then i will decide which way is best to drive water somewhere from house foundations
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic