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Need help with seed ID

 
Elaine Talley
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Could someone tell me what kind of seeds these are? I found them in my driveway in Coyote Poo. Yes, I used gloves to pick them up...lol.
I live in Southwest Ohio. Farming and woods, creeks area.
Thanks so much!
ET
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wild seeds I found in Coyote poo. I used gloves!...lol..
 
Miles Flansburg
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Wow that is a tough one! I think I would have to try to germinate one and see what the leaves look like.
 
Elaine Talley
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Hi Wyomiles!
I'm going to check my Persimom tree to see if they match up.
I'll let you know.
 
Miles Flansburg
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I am wondering how they would have gotten inside of a coyote? Do they eat fruits and berries?
 
Matt Smith
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Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Coyotes are opportunistic omnivores. Vegetable matter can frequently make up a majority of their diet.
 
Elaine Talley
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Hi Matt and Wyomiles!
I was just out in the snow storm looking for Persimon seeds!..LOL!
They look a little like my un known seed but the Persimon are much smaller.
They say you can predict the weather with Persimon seed by slicing them open.
Depending on what it looks like, spoon, fork or knife, that will determine what the weather will be.

Yes Matt is right, Coyotes will eat anything if they are hungry enough. He has been in my yard and out by Donkey Bill's barn, so that's a little scary!
I don't want Donkey and I to be his favorite meal!

A few years ago, Donkey and I were VERY close to being a Moutian Loin's DinDin!
I never want to go through that again!

I'll keep searching for the answer to these seeds.
HAPPY OUT DOOR PLAY!
 
Matt Smith
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Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Some of them look to be the right size, shape and color to be honeylocust seeds, but that bottom one is puzzling me.

 
Elaine Talley
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They do look alike don't they! Yes that one at the bottom of my photo is a very odd shape. These are really shiny and flat, very flat.
All of them seem to be the same size as well. 3/4 inch.
I'll look for more pics of Honeylocust seeds.
Thanks Matt!
 
Matt Smith
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Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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at 3/4" they might be too big to be honeylocust. they do look more "lima-beany" than honeylocust, if that make sense. more flattened-pan shape, whereas the honeylocust tend to be consistently ovular.
 
Elaine Talley
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Lol! Yes, yes, Lima beany ..lol.I agree! Only flater than that! I may have to go hiking in that patch of woods if the owners will let me. I could probably find the source of what plant the seeds came from that way. Or maybe ask the Coyote what he ate!...lol..
It did stop snowing for now.
 
Steve Flanagan
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Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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In california it is quite common to see manzanita berries in Coyote Scat.
 
Elaine Talley
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I have a few wonderful online friends that live in Calif. I'll have to ask them about that. This past Fall, we just finished moving to here, we could hear the Coyotes howling! Our new neighbor told me that our very long driveway is the Coyote path that leads from one woods to the other! Eeeek! I love animals and the Coyotes is the first to scare me.
 
Steve Flanagan
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Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Elaine Talley wrote:I have a few wonderful online friends that live in Calif. I'll have to ask them about that. This past Fall, we just finished moving to here, we could hear the Coyotes howling! Our new neighbor told me that our very long driveway is the Coyote path that leads from one woods to the other! Eeeek! I love animals and the Coyotes is the first to scare me.


Coyotes wont bother adult humans. They will pick off your cats or small dogs. Get a Great Dane, she will change their route.
 
Elaine Talley
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Oh Steve! I'd love to get a great Dane! They are so cute! I was told that My Sweet Donkey Bill would protect me from Coyotes, but he is alone out there! Could he fight off a pack of Coyotes? My Farrier says yes!...lol

I have to tell you an icky but cute story, off topic sort of. I take My Sweet Donkey Bill way down to the mailbox. He opens the mailbox and gets the mail out (himself/his self?). I put the mail on his pack and he carries the mail back to the house...

...Well the Coyote Poo is in the driveway, so Donkey sees it, stomps on it, digs at it and then pooz on top of it, just like a little Miniature Donkey would do!

When I let him do that, the Coyotes don't come back for some time after that.
I just hope I never see a pack of Coyotes! I worry about my babies! And me! I do have two big coonhounds! The one is a Black&Tan Coonhound, Miss EmmaLine. The other is a Walking Coonhound, Precious.
 
paul wheaton
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My first thought is: why do you want to identify seeds found in coyote poop?

My first though in looking at the pictures was "if they are really hard, then they are probably honey locust". But then, I'm thinking that there have to be gobs of species out there with similar seeds. So that makes me think that it would be really challenging to say for sure what it is - the best we can do is make a few guesses. The seeds from several different plants might look identical!
 
Elaine Talley
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Hi Paul!
Wow! I'm surprised you asked me that question! LOL!((((hugs))))
My Grumpy Hubby asked me the same thing! I thought that was a little rude of him!

But to answer you, I'm VERY curious of EVERYTHING! I find every little thing so exciting. Especially if I don't know about something.

On your answer to my seed ID. I agree with you. There are so many seeds that look alike. I think I will have to visit the woods where the Coyotes live to see what grows there. That would be the best way to match the seed with it's rightful plant.

Thank you all so very much for trying to help me ID this seed!
HAPPY OUTDOOR PLAY!
ET
 
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