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Jerusalem Artichokes

 
wayne stephen
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Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
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I planted 25 or so tubers last year. They did fairly well . I am interested in this batch for stock not this years food. If I leave them where they are will they multiply or do I need to dig them up and replant? I have too many other projects right now. I have heard they become woodier as they stay in ground but I assume they will form better eating tubers if I replant later. Right now I am just interested in forming a huge patch then to become bigger patches. What results have you all had ?
 
Iain Adams
Posts: 24
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Yes, they will multiply just fine if you leave them alone, though it takes a few years. Some disturbance / division of the tubers will speed up the process greatly, like it does with wild stands of sunchokes. I'd dig a few up and divide them into 3 or 4 and replant. If you do the same every time you harvest in the future, the patch will grow larger and healthier every year.

wayne stephen wrote:I planted 25 or so tubers last year. They did fairly well . I am interested in this batch for stock not this years food. If I leave them where they are will they multiply or do I need to dig them up and replant? I have too many other projects right now. I have heard they become woodier as they stay in ground but I assume they will form better eating tubers if I replant later. Right now I am just interested in forming a huge patch then to become bigger patches. What results have you all had ?
 
Matt Saager
Posts: 48
Location: Oregon - Willamette Valley
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Exactly right...
- leave them alone and they will grow and expand your patch
- dig them up and divide, and they will grow and expand much faster
If you planted 25 last year, you should have plenty to divide and double the size of your patch if you want to.

You might also try planting some of the extras in containers.
- a 5-gallon bucket with rich compost will grow several pounds of sunchokes to eat next year
- plant a couple in some 1-gal pots, to share with your friends

I took a large handful from my patch and planted along a walking path near my house.
It's a semi-wild area, so I will now have a secondary patch as well.
 
wayne stephen
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Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
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I'd say the scales have tipped towards digging and transplanting. Thanks
 
Miles Flansburg
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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If I want to store them in a pot over the winter, how must I take care of them ?
I just threw them in a bucket with some slightly moist compost and put them in the dark crawlspace. Will they rot? Will they make it untill next may?
Should I just rebury the bucket in the garden?
Should they be dry or moist?
 
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