• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Our "new" homestead by the river

 
Cal Burns
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wife and I bought an old pecan orchard. 5 acres, in zone 8b complete with small house, barn, old windmill and well (that currently don't work), and the backyard extends 140 feet sloping down some 40 feet slope wise to a small river (which faces north). Is partially shaded. Looking to build up the back area with edibles. Have a canopy of oaks, pecans, among other trees and plan to grow mulberries, blackberries, goumi, goji, plums, apples, stuff like air potato, moringa, New Zealand spinach, various other perennial vegetables. Want to get rid of the English ivy around the house with an edible perennial vine that serves a similar purpose. Am building a hugel bed on a slope situated next to a stone wall, and piling up rotten wood and logs to mix in with compost. Want to build the slope up more and have fruit and perennials around. Plan to initially grow a cover crop, then some perennials as more funds become available. The soil looks to be good. Haven't tested it yet. With the squirrels, deer, and other wildlife that roam the property it could be a challenge for harvesting. Across the river is 500 acres of woodland. In the past week have seen/heard egrets, falcons, turkeys, deer. Plan to grow onions, lavender, and electric fencing to keep deer away. Ideas are welcome!





P1220493.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1220493.JPG]
P1220343 - Copy.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1220343 - Copy.JPG]
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3658
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
134
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow that looks sweet!
 
Cal Burns
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Miles Flansburg wrote:Wow that looks sweet!

Thanks. It is! The back area I think has lots of potential. Building up a hugel area at the moment where the stones are. Will take awhile to figure out the varieties of plants growing naturally as they blossom out.
 
Paul Cereghino
gardener
Posts: 855
Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
15
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you're the south bank, you are responsible for shading your reach of the river. Learn about natural river edge, scour pools, back eddies, wood recruitment etc. Lots of native shrubs take from stakes. Cottonwood buds make nice ointment. Willow good for baskets. Anticipate high water. Consider beaver.
 
Cal Burns
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Paul Cereghino wrote:If you're the south bank, you are responsible for shading your reach of the river. Learn about natural river edge, scour pools, back eddies, wood recruitment etc. Lots of native shrubs take from stakes. Cottonwood buds make nice ointment. Willow good for baskets. Anticipate high water. Consider beaver.
Thanks. Good points to consider. Have never seen beaver around here, and the water is typically only 3 feet deep or less. The water has reached the back of our porch once I'm told so it can happen. Is one reason why I'm building up stone sections to avoid soil erosion and have hugel beds, and trying to make best use of the natural contour of the property. Dead peach and pecan trees and compost have been going in the hugel bed. There are some Chinaberry trees that I'd like to get rid of, course I won't be putting them there. Lots to do.
 
Cohan Fulford
Posts: 79
Location: West Central Alberta, Canada
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks like a great site- z 8b is tropical to me- lots of possibilities - have fun!
 
Randy Bachman
Posts: 15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Are you in a flood plain? I am looking at a property very similar without the house. But Im concerned since its in the 100 year flood plain. Neighbors have said it can be covered with water a day or two following a heavy rain. There are no signs of erosion and the woods next door and across the stream are fine. I am concerned that long-term having a well, house and septic would be a mess if inundated (even if the house is built on stilts). How have you considered these problems?
 
Cal Burns
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, in the revised 100 year flood plain. Water has gotten to the bottom of the porch once since the house was built and that was a freak flood after solid rains every day for over a week. Had to buy flood insurance for the whole structure even though it would only be flooring effected if it ever happened again.
 
A Dow
Posts: 21
Location: Depending on the time of the year: San Diego, California, or Louisville Kentucky
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow, this looks and sounds like a dream!!! A good edible vine is Malabar Spinach... The only type of spinach, I believe , that grows in the warm part of the year
 
Cal Burns
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It is! Saw a wild turkey running down the road the other day in front of our orchard. Have tried malabar spinach before. Need to grow some more. Wanting to focus more on perennial edibles.
 
Cal Burns
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Along the slope I've been piling lots of dead tree limbs, logs and plan to haul in dirt and plant cover crops on initially then fruit trees and edible root crops. On reflection, it probably would have been better to have done swales first then bring in the wood material. I think it will still work as a hugel bed, just not soak up, capture rainwater as efficiently. May plant mint around border as I've heard squirrels can burrow into the hugels. Also have ground squirrels around.
Thoughts?
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
it looks absolutely wonderful..can't wait to see what you do with it..the start of the hugel beds look good as well..great way to add a growing area ..nice curvy accent too
 
James Colbert
Posts: 265
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To keep the deer out you may want to consider a hedge, or fedge (fence hedge) instead of an electric fence. It would look better in that natural setting and it could feed the deer as well on the outside of the hedge. Maximillian Sunflower will make a quick hedge which can be replaced with something even stronger and longer lasting like a fedge of osage orange or other fast growing strong plant. It should cost less, last longer, and look more attractive. Just a thought.
 
Cal Burns
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As to the deer, thanks for the suggestions of a fedge. Have been looking into. Meanwhile the deer roam where they want.
Would like to get an edible hedge growing.
 
A. M. Watters
Posts: 21
Location: Central Texas, Edwards Plateau
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Absolutely beautiful!
 
It's just a flesh wound! Or a tiny ad:
The stocking-stuffer that plants a forest:
FoodForestCardGame.com
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic