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controlling fungus  RSS feed

 
paul wheaton
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
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We are all starry eyed over the good fungi ....  and we have also run screaming from the bad fungi ....

I wonder if we should post our fungal woes here and see if the fungi perfecti folks can help us come up with solutions to that too.  ??

 
Leah Sattler
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oooh. my fungi woe. ringworm. 


our kitten came home with ring worm unbenownst to me. very mild. In fact I only figured it out when my daughter got ringworm. finally decided it was from the kitten. the vet confirmed it by finding a tiny little patch of hair on her toe that was missing and some thinning hair near her ear, and plucking some to test.

I treated all three cats even though only two came down with any visible symptoms. now my older cat who was symptom free for weeks seems to be getting some thinning hair! arghh...

all ring worm patches on humans have been treated and are gone. I never got one which I attribute to my habit of smearing coconut oil mixed with tea tree oil as a moisturizer all over. but who really knows if that was just a coincidence.

while dealing with it I couldn't help but ponder some possible natural treatments. aside from tea tree oil and coconut oil which are reported to have anti fungal properties, the idea of using strong tea or vinegar crossed my mind.
 
Gwen Lynn
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Leah Sattler wrote:
oooh. my fungi woe. ringworm. 


To some extent, I think some people (& maybe cats?) are more susceptible to fungi than others. Athelete's Foot or toenail fungus for example. Some folks get it time and time again, but some don't. I used to go to the Y, health clubs, gyms, etc. back when I was younger. I never had those fungi. Poor dh has bouts with them though and has to be stay on the defense to avoid recurrences.

I wonder if your cat has just scratched himself & lost hair, or perhaps he was "having a scramble" and got some hair scratched off in the scuffle?
 
Leah Sattler
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it is possible. I am rather wary now. it seems to be an overall thinning of his hair on parts of his back and his ears. the ear thing is supposedly a giveway according to the vet. but he is also old. maybe that makes him more susceptable. I have read that some particular cats seem to be more susceptable to it in general. if it continues to worsen then I will further my efforts in determining the cause. hopefully it will spontaneously correct itself or the antifungals will work. he already went to the vet to have his remaining molar removed last month and he is not a good patient. I hate to subject him to the stress again.
 
rose macaskie
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  Stamets talks of controlling honey fungi with cauliflower fungi, crispy cauliflower, called, sparassis crispa the second the couliflower mushroom, a mildly parasitic fungi, seems to outgrow honey mushrooms a much worse absolutely deadly fungi for trees, destroying it or really reducing its impact and so paul stamets innoculates trees with one parasite to get rid of the other. He has come to wonder if the cauliflower one is a parasitic fungi that eats livign plants rather than a saprofitic fungi that eats dead plant matter. 
    If you want to see the fotos you have to look for his book half published in google or buy it to be found if you tap in mycelium running paul stamets.
      He says cauliflower mushroom is a good eating mushroom maybe he sells cauliflower mushroom kits. agri rose macaskie.
 
samiam kephart
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I have found that applying aloe vera on athletes foot will knock it out. i have a plant so I use it fresh applying once a day. Sam
 
                    
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I can remember an old Native woman in our neighborhood would crush up black walnut husks & put them in a little hot water with Garlic & crushed peach pits & then mash the whole mess into a paste & apply it to her grand kids for ring worm.
She came after me once when I had a patch on my forearm, it was messy but it seemed to work, my patch went away.

BUT I'm not sure you could use it on cats because they will lick their fur. I think peach pits are poisonous to ingest & walnut husks might be too. 
D
 
rose macaskie
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siam. How do you cut a bit of aloe vera everyday to put o? I have tried to use it and become so worried about how that i did not go on. Like do you cut a bitl off and keep it in the fridge and cut a bit off that everyday till you need a new bit in the fridge when you cut another leaf off or do you cut off the tip of the leaf and then another slice each day. I feel this is a silly question but it is what i want to know. rose
 
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