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Use plugs of different varieties on same log?

 
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I have recently made a few mushroom logs and I have some plugs left over of different mushrooms... shitake, maitake, pearl oyster, etc.. Can I use plugs of different varieties on the same log? I am guessing not, but I wanted to double check first. Thanks.
 
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Location: noth western michigan, petoskey
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No I would not. Im told that one will eventually out compete the others and you would only get one type in the end anyways. Im growing the same ones this year. hope yours do well.
 
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Just cut the log so it's smaller and have a small log with one variety of fungi on it. That's what I do. If I only have 4 left over, I will make it a rich log and find a place to put it into a log already plugged.
John S
PDX OR
 
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Yes, you can do it. Take a look in the forest, you will find several species growing happily on the same log. You may only get one species fruiting if it is particularly fast at colonizing the log, but don't let that stop you trying. Different fungi co-exist on logs, perhaps helping each other-I find that competition can be healthy.
 
John Suavecito
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I guess it all depends on the risk you want to take. Many mycologists have devised strategies to get rid of one type of fungi by introducing another, more aggressive type of fungi to the same piece of wood. However, it doesn't sound like you want one to wipe out the other. It sounds like you want to keep both. In the latter case, it sounds like a very poor strategy, but depending on your tolerance of one type of fungi being wiped out or neither fruiting well at all, you could do it.
John S
PDX OR
 
wil borowski
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Just finished a course for 30 students-along with lots of petri dish cultures and grain spawn, everyone was given a eucalyptus log to inoculate. Some people chose to do multiple species on a single log-shiitake and phoenix oysters, so in 6-12 months we shall see if these species are compatible.
I'm about to do some with enoki, shiitake and phoenix-hope to have a log that fruits over an extended time.
Also, some fungi prefer wood that has been colonised by other fungi.
 
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