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Small farm buildout

 
pollinator
Posts: 1326
Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
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Mostly pictures. I’ve been bad but I have been busy.
Carbon-hoarding.jpeg
Carbon hoarding
Carbon hoarding
Fertilizer-and-fuel-(for-me).jpeg
Fertilizer and fuel (for me)
Fertilizer and fuel (for me)
Mobile-coop.jpeg
Mobile coop
Mobile coop
Clearing-sweetgum-making-mushrooms.jpeg
Clearing sweetgum making mushrooms
Clearing sweetgum making mushrooms
Shiitake.jpeg
Shiitake
Shiitake
Oysters.jpeg
Oysters
Oysters
 
Tj Jefferson
pollinator
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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More pictures sorry slow internet. Will try to add text but I’m only able to upload from my phone
Cold-oysters.jpeg
Cold oysters
Cold oysters
Stropharia.jpeg
Stropharia
Stropharia
Breaking-stuff-having-to-fix-all-manner-of-things.jpeg
Breaking stuff having to fix all manner of things
Breaking stuff having to fix all manner of things
Beater-truck-brake-issues-proportionality-valve(-didn-t-know-what-that-was-a-couple-weeks-ago).jpeg
Beater truck brake issues proportionality valve( didn’t know what that was a couple weeks ago)
Beater truck brake issues proportionality valve( didn’t know what that was a couple weeks ago)
 
Tj Jefferson
pollinator
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hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
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Clearing mostly done spread about 300 yards of chips and subsoiled them down 18-24” on key lines
4507BA92-7999-49F7-9C73-04DA742AEBA6.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 4507BA92-7999-49F7-9C73-04DA742AEBA6.jpeg]
Different-raised-bed-experiments-with-mushroom-logs-as-walls.jpeg
Different raised bed experiments with mushroom logs as walls
Different raised bed experiments with mushroom logs as walls
 
pollinator
Posts: 649
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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Tj,  With the chips deep in the soil it will reduce the nitrogen.  Are you going to leave this field fallow for a couple years?
 
Tj Jefferson
pollinator
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Not at all. Seeded with Sesbania and gamagrass. I’m planning on “grazing “ sheep and chic on it and something will grow based on Greg Judy and Joel Salatin. If I have to feen hay year one it’s ok!
 
Tj Jefferson
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Have done 180’ of mushroom logs so far a few hours at a time. Need 300’ for this garden. I’m exhausted but hopefully will get it done next two weekends.
 
gardener
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Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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Tj, do you have a thread with more details on the chicken coop? Looks like rain water collection and some other goodies on it. I'd love to see more detail!
 
pollinator
Posts: 244
Location: Italian Alps, Zone 8
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Tj posted a wonderful description of his chicken coop on one of my threads here: https://permies.com/t/135321/seed-existing-pasture-uprooting-soil
I for one, would love to hear more about your mushroom logs, TJ! Am I right the assume that the black spots on the bark of the tree is where you cut down the bark a bit to add the spores to it?
What kind of logs are you using (type of tree and how old)? And at what period in the year do you add the spores?
 
Tj Jefferson
pollinator
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Sorry been working away from home. Yes the black spots are wax from the spawning. I no longer use sawdust or grain spawn if I don’t have to, dowels are so much faster and the birds were digging out the sawdust and grain and ruining the logs.

I’m going to get a coop video tomorrow and post to YouTube with a link. The chix are literally in the front yard. The coop goes everywhere. They are in an area that had some infestation with cocoon worms and the chix will hopefully decrease the problem.
 
gardener
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TJ,

When you really get serious with woodchips and mushrooms, you really get serious with woodchips and mushrooms!

I am curious, why bother key lining in the woodchips (which look amazing btw) in the first place.  When I have just plopped chips (a LOT less than you) onto the ground, within a year I cannot find where the chips end and soil begin—and I have some pretty dense clay.  I am just curious.

180’ of mushroom logs is pretty impressive.  I don’t think I will be doing Shiitake any time soon—I am one of those persons who can’t tolerate the taste.  Wine Caps, yes, portobello, definitely, Oysters, we are going to find out, but shiitake, no way.

Nonetheless, a very impressive accomplishment indeed.

Eric
 
Tj Jefferson
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Eric, the chips are deep in an area I just cleared, so there are a few reasons to keyline/subsoil.
-remove as many roots as possible from the sweetgums which are awful
-drive organic matter into the clay for traditional keyline benefits
-allow for areas of "soilish" material to allow planting gamagrass which takes a whole year before grazing (apparently) and I don't have a drill so this was the best way of getting seed/soil contact.
-allow for buried water line
-prevent the chips from washing down- at all- into the lower area where the pond is going. that would wreck the clay for the key. Still waterlogged right now probably have to wait for summer at this point.

I'm doing 90' of 16" diameter oyster logs this week since there is an hour after work. I've gone through a battery on the cordless drill. My other project is still on hold- making a mini-Paul electric vehicle with a DC to AC to run drills off the UTV batteries.




 
Tj Jefferson
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Sorry, I missed the question about the species-
Sweetgum for shiitake, nameko, and testing maitake and lions mane. Its a trash wood, sort of related to oak and closed cell so it should work in theory for all those.
Oyster is what I see on poplar (yellow or tulip poplar) in the woods and it fruits fast, like in 6 months even on these big logs.
 
Tj Jefferson
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I just posted the walkaround, its crappy because its direct from my phone and I was going to splice it, but can't get it to my PC from my stupid iphone.
 
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Location: Piedmont, North Carolina - 7b/8a
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I hear you on the trashy Sweetgum. I have turned a lot into Shitake mushrooms myself.  I did a little experiment with lion's mane a few years ago and it wasn't successful.  They were small diameter logs, maybe 2-4".  I am interested to hear if the larger diameter logs might be successful.  Oysters also have done well for me on gum, but I don't use them much since the bugs and squirrels always get to them first.  The logs also were much shorter lived, partly because the squirrels liked to rip the bark off.  This was especially true of oysters on yellow poplar...they just peeled the bark right off!
 
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I really like the idea of mushroom logs for the raised beds.
 
Dennis Bangham
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Mark Griffin wrote:  Oysters also have done well for me on gum, but I don't use them much since the bugs and squirrels always get to them first.  The logs also were much shorter lived, partly because the squirrels liked to rip the bark off.  This was especially true of oysters on yellow poplar...they just peeled the bark right off!


Look into getting some cool and cold weather varieties. I have wide range and cool weather varieties of Shiitake that provides me with a bounty in late fall and early spring.
20200223_105046.jpg
Bowl of Shiitake
Bowl of Shiitake
 
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