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Broccoli - Sow seed on leaf or flower day

 
Dorothy Elizabeth Werenfrid
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Which days have you found best for producing Cauliflower and Broccoli types? Leaf or Flower?
 
Adam Klaus
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I have gone both ways, but now plant on leaf days. Why? One of my biggest problems with both broccoli and cauli is premature heading (bolting). In contrast, I have never had a plant grow a large robust set of leaves and then fail to produce a head. So I figure that promoting a good leaf growth, descending energy, is a good idea for a healthy plant that runs its full life cycle before ultimately heading up. Additionally, we dont really want the broccoli or cauli to flower. We just want it to head up as big as it can without actually opening flowers. So it is more of a vegetative (leaf/root) quality we are looking for, not a reproductive one (flower/fruit). At this point in my experience, I would rather plant on a root day than a flower day for that reason, with leaf days being my ultimate preference.
 
Dorothy Elizabeth Werenfrid
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Adam Klaus wrote:I have gone both ways, but now plant on leaf days. Why? One of my biggest problems with both broccoli and cauli is premature heading (bolting). In contrast, I have never had a plant grow a large robust set of leaves and then fail to produce a head. So I figure that promoting a good leaf growth, descending energy, is a good idea for a healthy plant that runs its full life cycle before ultimately heading up. Additionally, we dont really want the broccoli or cauli to flower. We just want it to head up as big as it can without actually opening flowers. So it is more of a vegetative (leaf/root) quality we are looking for, not a reproductive one (flower/fruit). At this point in my experience, I would rather plant on a root day than a flower day for that reason, with leaf days being my ultimate preference.


Thanks for that - I always used to plant on flower days, but last season decided to try leaf days. Of course it is difficult to make a decision as to which was best owing to the terrible year, though I did feel the cauliflowers were smaller than normal - but there again they might have "held" longer. Think I shall go for leaf days again this year.

Many thanks for the swift reply
 
Adam Klaus
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glad that helped Dorothy,
I am much more experienced with cauliflower than broccoli, and wanted to reccomed a varietal that I find to be absolutely superior for growing main season cauliflower. The varietal is 'Amazing', it is open pollinated, and I typically get seeds from Johnny's. I start seeds in 50 cell flats in April, transplant to the garden in May, and harvest in July/August. Last summer I yielded some heads that were 6 pounds and nearly the size of a basketball. Our summers dont get too hot, maxing out around 90F, and our soils are a rich fertile clay. Notwithstanding, I continue to be amazed by 'Amazing'.
 
Dorothy Elizabeth Werenfrid
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Thanks for that. I only ever grow winter cropping cauliflowers as I am pestered by Cabbage White Butterfly, plus at that time of year I have lots of beans and peas etc. I usually grow one of the Walderschan (sp) winter hardy types or All year Round.
 
John Mcdogoode
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Dorothy Elizabeth Werenfrid wrote:Which days have you found best for producing Cauliflower and Broccoli types? Leaf or Flower?


Secrets of the Soil mentioned planting broccoli on flower days while cauliflower is planted on leaf days.
 
elle sagenev
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Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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I'm not sure what is meant by leaf and flower days. Someone explain please!
 
Scot Schmidt
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elle sagenev wrote:I'm not sure what is meant by leaf and flower days. Someone explain please!


Bump, Me too.
 
John Mcdogoode
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I would have to find a book or online source to explain in detail, but basically biodynamic planting uses a schedule based of celestial bodies' influence on Earth and it's plants, animals, and subtle energy. For example, the moon and each planet embody different energies, much like astrology does. Certain planets embody different energy which effects plants differently based off which part of the plant is desired to be worked with. Biodynamic agriculture relies heavily on intent to work properly, as do most things in this existence/reality/dimension/planet. Maria Thun did extensive work on a planting calendar and the effects for decades in Europe. If you want to plant broccoli for example the florets are consumed typically, being the flower part of the plant, days under the influence of energy benefiting flower crops, fire I believe. Carrots, onions, and potatoes would be examples of root crops, earth energy, and are typically harvested in the afternoon or evening when energy is flowing downward. Conversely, leaf crops such as lettuce, greens, cauliflower (as this thread mentioned), are worked with on leaf days, water energy (planets/influences). However, leaf crops should be harvested on root or fruit days due to the watery, wet influences of leaf days causing molds, etc (cabbages harvest on flower days). Stella Natura is a company that produces annual calendars for biodynamic farmers, their website has much more in depth information on these concepts. I have just a few notes I jotted down from Secrets of the Soil pertaining to such celestial guidance in stewardship.. full moons enhance germination, optimally right before the full moon. Abosrption and metabolism are at peak during full moon, so harvesting crops around this time is bad if they are meant for long storage. Crops meant to be above ground, ie any but root, it is best to sow on a waxing moon. Root crops are sown as the moon wanes. A descending or running high to low moon is best for downward growth such as transplant, pruning plants, or taking cuttings. Conversely ascending moons are good for germination as the energy and growth is flowing upwards. All these are recommendations and by no means a law or rule, more so suggestions made by Steiner and observed through trial and error by Maria Thun to harmonious with larger than typical humans think, celestial, and cosmic forces or energies. Hope this helped!
 
Cee Ray
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Location: BC Interior, zone 5a
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Adam Klaus wrote:glad that helped Dorothy,
I am much more experienced with cauliflower than broccoli, and wanted to reccomed a varietal that I find to be absolutely superior for growing main season cauliflower. The varietal is 'Amazing', it is open pollinated, and I typically get seeds from Johnny's. I start seeds in 50 cell flats in April, transplant to the garden in May, and harvest in July/August. Last summer I yielded some heads that were 6 pounds and nearly the size of a basketball. Our summers dont get too hot, maxing out around 90F, and our soils are a rich fertile clay. Notwithstanding, I continue to be amazed by 'Amazing'.


I like that one too.

Leaf days are what I've always heard.
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