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Plant ID again

 
Richard Gorny
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Location: Poland, zone 5
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Does anyone knows this plant?

plant1.jpg
[Thumbnail for plant1.jpg]
 
Mickey Kleinhenz
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Location: Houston, TX
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maybe a type of dock(Rumex)
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I'm pretty confident that's a broad-leafed dock.
It really enjoys acidic, compacted, wet, anaerobic soils.
I grew up around dairy farms. Cows don't like eating dock and it can really overwhelm pasture.
But it's a great dynamic accumulator and I'm trying to get over my childhood dock-hating training.
I'd still cut out the seed-spike.
Dock seed can ripen when cut extremely green, but like most tap-rooted plants, it's very protein-rich and makes a heck of a weed tea. Just don't get it on you.
Think 'the splatter of eternal stench"...
 
Richard Gorny
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Location: Poland, zone 5
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books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur urban
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There are plenty of these plants on a wild, non-cultivated meadows by the river, I've found them while collecting wild comfrey leaves for a mulch. Thanks for an idea of using it for a weed tea (which I usually do from stinging nettles). Wouldn't it be too acidic though?
 
Leila Rich
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Richard Gorny wrote:Thanks for an idea of using it for a weed tea [...] Wouldn't it be too acidic though?

As far as I know, plants themselves are generally ph neutral, and those that favour low or high ph have developed mechanisms to take advantage of a difficult niche.
Maybe someone who knows stuff can step in!
This weed soup thread might be helpful.
Take note of the seed viability bit; I think dock seed would probably ripen and survive underwater for a very long time.
As I said, I've generally made peace with dock but it's a sod of a thing in the garden, and like comfrey regrows from any piece of root left in the soil.
Actually, I think dock and comfrey have many similarities, hence my determination to love dock
 
Richard Gorny
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Location: Poland, zone 5
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As far as I know all docks contain a substantial amount of oxalates and/or oxalatic acid, thus my question about acidity (I might be wrong though).
 
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