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burying a placenta

 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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Today I gave birth to a robust baby boy! To my delight, the hospital let me have the placenta.

Of course I am thinking about my gardens and growing food forest.

I have a hugelbeet that I am building in three stages, one is done, one is begun, and one is planned. I was thinking of putting the placenta in there, or perhaps just digging a hole and planting it under a tree/guild.

Are there any things I should take into consideration? Has anyone tried this? We have a lot of wildlife here, how deep should I bury it? Any suggestions on typos of plantings to go above?
 
Meryt Helmer
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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If I was going to use it in my garden I might look into how native Americans used to bury fish in garden beds.

I always liked the idea of planting a placenta or part of one under a special tree that could grow with a child. or any long lived perennial I suppose.

With both my children I had home births and chose to eat the placentas. I had it encapsulated. I did this because it can help with the hormonal changes that happened after having a baby. It helps prevent postpartum depression and stuff. This would only be an option if it has been kept refrigerated or frozen and it sounds like it is not something you would want to do.
 
            
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wow first off CONGRATULATIONS! Have you considered the options of preserving it? (lacto-ferm / brine?) I mean for your own and mom's consumption at some point. Im wondering something similar. Bokashi would probably work best for the rapid decaying and return to earth, but you got me thinking how to put it to nutritional use. where else can you find such a rich source DHEA and stem cells? what if the child requires it later in life? (not meant jack your thread). best to you and yours!
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
69
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
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I suppose you are right, that the nutritional content puts the placenta into the category of people food.

I'm not sure that I will eat it, but we didhave a friend take it home and put it in the freezer for its, so we could. I don't have an urge to eat it, but I do have an urge to bury it. Maybe that's because I've been a little obsessed with getting things happening in the garden and building the hugels before I had the baby.

I wonder if I don't have an urge to eat it because the hospital had treated my other placenta from my other children as dangerous medical waste. Even though I wanted them, I wonder if some attitude crept in to my mind.

In theory this is meat vegans could eat, yes?

I'm still interested in whether anyone has done this and/or has any advice
20130421_161046.jpg
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the building of the finished bit of the hugelbeet, with my two year old watering it with water from the pool cover
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the new baby
 
Tokunbo Popoola
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Location: Sacramento, CA
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Matu Collins wrote:I suppose you are right, that the nutritional content puts the placenta into the category of people food.

I'm not sure that I will eat it, but we didhave a friend take it home and put it in the freezer for its, so we could. I don't have an urge to eat it, but I do have an urge to bury it. Maybe that's because I've been a little obsessed with getting things happening in the garden and building the hugels before I had the baby.

I wonder if I don't have an urge to eat it because the hospital had treated my other placenta from my other children as dangerous medical waste. Even though I wanted them, I wonder if some attitude crept in to my mind.

In theory this is meat vegans could eat, yes?

I'm still interested in whether anyone has done this and/or has any advice


i think if it comes from your own body without exploiting it in some way.. then yes it's a by product. like if a marcher was going to "drink own brew" so to speak.

To be honest I would look into freeze my own kid placenta if I did have one. It would be crazy expensive though. It's just the potential of what could be done with placenta is just staggering.
 
Con Elder
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If it was a home birth i would consider eating it. If birth was in a hospital, not given germs etc. in that environment. Maybe i'm exagerating but that's my feeling on it. Wildlife sweep them up pretty fast when it comes to cows placentas, but guess a few heavy rocks on top in a site close to dwelling house should deter them from digging the soil.

Often cows eat them as well. I remember thinking it might be unhealthy for them; quite the opposite going by what i've read here, and of course they know best what's good for them. My sisters get a little offended if i relate my experience with animals to humans, but just too many similarities in their nature and the remedies used on both. I trust that we're not so alienated from the animal kingdom here.
 
tel jetson
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it's got a lot of nutrients and minerals in it, which is why animals eat them and why consuming placenta can prevent postpartum depression et cetera. that's also why it would be very good to grow under a plant. it won't, however, offer long-term nutrition, as it's relatively small and will break down quickly and will be moved around by critters in the dirt.

I like the idea of planting a special fruit tree on top of it. might turn out to be the kid's favorite fruit.
 
Tom Harner
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Location: St. Louis, MO
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I would like to second (or third) the fruit tree idea. It just seems fitting; if taken care of in the near future, you and your kid will have a long term living symbol of your love for him... Trust me, you will need the reminder sometimes, especially with a boy. Plus, there are ample symbolic representations between fruit trees and rearing children...

That is my vote.
 
john giroux
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Location: Cumming, GA
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I planted Princeton elm trees on my kids placentas 6 years ago. They are over the top of the house now and shading my western exposure. Fruit trees are a great idea. I would love having the kids being able to enjoy the fruit as they both grow.
 
Ann Degen
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I'm not sure how deep to bury it, but you can make a tincture out of a little bit too.
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I'm a happy omnivore, but I'm not a parent.
Eating a placenta makes sense if it's one's own I suppose.
My family have been burying placentas under trees for yonks; but this is NZ and critters don't generally dig things up....
My un-critter-related comment would be: plant a tree that thrives in your environment.
A family member's 'birth tree' died twice , and while it's silly, superstitious and all that, it made us feel a bit odd!
 
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