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Leah Sattler
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does anyone have a good go to site with a tutorial for knitting. I got the very very very basics from my grandmother as a child and my hands still remember that. it is something I would like to casually learn and now is a good time.
 
Brenda Groth
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i crochet but don't particualarly enjoy knitting..try googling knitting how to
 
Jami McBride
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I found some nice info on about.com, back when my daughter and I were knitting (used the round knitting rings and a homemade knitting board, never needles).  And eHow.com was helpful too.  But the Yarn Co. has learn to knit lessons posted here http://www.theyarnco.com/instruction.php

The weaving type knitting on the pegs of the rings and board was very easy and fascinating in a hypnotic way, so you may want to consider this method too.  I'm more of a sewer than a yarn person.  This is why I lean toward felting and not spinning 

My Mother, Grandmother, Great Grandmother were all big crocheters, this is what I was taught as a child, and it came in handy when I went to make my own rag-rugs, but I never took up crocheting.  I admire people who have this kind of patience.

Best of luck to you Leah - please share some pictures of your projects, I love seeing handcrafted things.
 
                                      
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Hi

I'm new here but I love to knit!!  Knit Picks, a yarn co. has some fab videos on line.  Most are for instruction for beginners.  Bookstores are loaded with cd,s for beginners.  I learned from a tape from Barnes and Nobles.  Elizabeth Zimmerman @ Schoolhouse Press also on line you have to order from them has an excellent one Knitting Workshop I found helpful.  You tube has lots and the TV show knitty Gritty on HGTV or one of those networks is free, and wonderful. 

I can't read directions to do things like that.  I need to see the stitches formed.  I even learned how to knit socks and knit in the round on double point needles by video.  All on TV and videos Amazon.com has a good amount also.
 
Leah Sattler
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thanks knitsister! those are the sort of thing I need! I just didn't know where to start!
 
                                      
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Hope it helps
 
                                    
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  With cold weather coming on soon; I thought I'd bump this up to the top....and see if anyone is interested in knitting things to keep us WARM this winter !??!

I crochet, knit, and spin my own wool.  I have tons of patterns; so if I can help anybody, give a holler.  I'm a night-owl most of the time. 

Right now I am knitting hats, scarves and mittens for the Elders on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.  If anyone wants to knit mittens ( 2 needle or 4 double points ) ??  and gets stuck...

I'll try to help.  If you need a pattern...just holler !  I also have tons of baby patterns for newborns and preemies. 
Connie
 
                              
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yeah, I woudl start with youtube and do "how to knit" or how to knit tutorial. It's amazing what you can find on youtube!!!
 
Irene Kightley
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I knit for a living using the wool from our Angora goats.

I make hundreds of pairs of socks every year. They take about an hour to knit on a chunky single bed knitting machine and are a really good skill to learn because the socks are really lovely to wear and are very useful for bartering and giving as presents.





The instructions are in my blog.

http://lafermedesourrou.blogspot.com/search/label/comfortable%20clothes

 
Jami McBride
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Beautiful, Irene those are really nicely done.

Do you process all your wool yourself?  The cleaning, carding and all really intimidates me.
 
Irene Kightley
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It intimidates me too ! 

I only do a little to show people how it's done, the rest we send to co-op and it comes back in hanks. It takes too long to spin wool to be able to sell it at a profit
 
Derek Brewer
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ravelry.com has hundreds of patterns and people to help you every step of the way. My girlfriend is a frequent user of that forum and has been into all of the fiber arts for quite a long time now. She also recommended knitty.com and the ubiquitous youtube for tutorials.

As for books... Stitch and Bitch is apparently a highly regarded book for beginners and more advanced folks alike.

Hope this helps, and good luck!
 
                            
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My Mrs. is a real good knitter and she say start simple and practice, practice, practice.
 
Fred Morgan
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True confession time, I am a guy, rather large (over six foot, sort of resemble Herman Munster) and I used to knit. I would here too, except we don't need anything warm except perhaps one month a year.

I know how to knit, crochet, hook weave ... and play American football. 

Maybe I can knit me a hammock...
 
jacque greenleaf
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Knitting a hammock - it's been done!

Recall seeing a library book written by a guy who knits. IIRC, he smoothed and pointed the tips of a couple of dowels and used a clothesline rope. You'd have to experiment a bit with stitch patterns and sizes, the idea has always intrigued me!
 
Jami McBride
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Awh, the skills of a well rounded man Fred 
 
Fred Morgan
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Jami McBride wrote:
Awh, the skills of a well rounded man Fred 


Having lost weight, I am not all that well rounded anymore... 
 
Moni Dew
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if you haven't yet discovered KnittingHelp.com, you should check it out.  wonderful wealth of videos there, too.  I'm MoniDew at KnittingHelp forums and on Ravelry.  If you need any help, give me a shout.


socks I made for a friend - handknit
 
Irene Kightley
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Those socks really are a work of art MoniDew.

Beautiful !
 
Perry Way
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Fred Morgan wrote:
True confession time, I am a guy, rather large (over six foot, sort of resemble Herman Munster) and I used to knit. I would here too, except we don't need anything warm except perhaps one month a year.

I know how to knit, crochet, hook weave ... and play American football. 

Maybe I can knit me a hammock...


Fred, I'm a man and I knit too.  In fact I knit pretty good actually. I used to own 5 knitting machines as well at one time. But I got rid of them to fund other hobbies and now just content to hand knit the occasional item.  I knit a lot of hats.

Also, the word is the origins of knitting began with fishermen from having made fishing nets, the process of knitting became invented. Not sure if that's true but the general understanding is that back in the day, in the primitive technology days, the men were knitters and the women were weavers.
 
                                    
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To FRED and OFF THE GRID;  Keep  knitting !!    Don't give it up; and seriously think of teaching others.....  It's a dying art; and in the future, it may be a serious form of bartered goods ! 

I'm a female and I knit, crochet, quilt & spin my own wool. 

There are many charities that take knitted goods of all forms for the soldiers, the Indian Reservations, preemie babies, school kids, etc.  I knit for them all; since most of my family has shown no respect for "all things knitted " ...      So I knit for those who really appreciate it.  ( And family doesn't get gifts anymore...) 

If either of you need addresses for a charity; please email me... 

And KEEP KNITTING !!!  YAY !! 
 
Brenda Groth
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Irene and Moni, do you sell your socks that you make? I would love love love to have some...esp like the brown color ones Irene, they look so comfy..message me if you do and give me price and info..bre (would have to wait until after holidays to buy  any)
 
Moni Dew
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Brenda Groth wrote:
Irene and Moni, do you sell your socks that you make? I would love love love to have some...esp like the brown color ones Irene, they look so comfy..message me if you do and give me price and info..bre (would have to wait until after holidays to buy  any)


Brenda, assuming the price of materials is about the same, I would suggest that you purchase from Irene, as you would only have to pay for an hour of her time on her machine.  Hand knitting takes hours upon hours, (about a week).  And I really don't think you'd want to pay me for a week of time just for a pair of socks, no matter how lovely.  That is why I give knitting as gifts.  It's too priceless to sell.  LOL! 
 
Moni Dew
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Off The Grid wrote:

Also, the word is the origins of knitting began with fishermen from having made fishing nets, the process of knitting became invented. Not sure if that's true but the general understanding is that back in the day, in the primitive technology days, the men were knitters and the women were weavers.



all true! 
 
Moni Dew
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Irene Kightley wrote:
Those socks really are a work of art MoniDew.

Beautiful !


Thank you, Irene!
 
Cate Weaver
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YouTube has some really good videos and there's the website:
knitandcrochettoday.com


 
This parrot is no more. It has ceased to be. Now it's a tiny ad:

The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers:
http://richsoil.com/cards


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