• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • r ranson
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler
  • Mike Barkley

Weed ID

 
Posts: 13
Location: Burkburnett, TX Zone 7b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This grows like a little tree especially in compacted soils and has a big taproot. Just wondering what it is. In north Texas.
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
 
Jason Talmage
Posts: 13
Location: Burkburnett, TX Zone 7b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thinking milkweed but corrected if I'm wrong
 
pollinator
Posts: 1613
Location: northern California
231
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Definitely a pigweed....Amaranth. The greens are edible cooked (in moderate amounts especially in rich soils as it can accumulate nitrate), and so are the tiny seeds if you can manage to gather enough of them. It's an indicator of, yes, compacted, but also relatively fertile soils....
 
Jason Talmage
Posts: 13
Location: Burkburnett, TX Zone 7b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks alder. It kind of looked edible. I hoped this soil would be somewhat fertile. But I don't know if it is because of all the industrial fertilizer used around this area or if it is fertile naturally.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3171
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
355
2
forest garden solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Amaranth or calaloo in Jamaica. Same family as spinach so dont fertilize because it stores nitrates. Its really delicious.
 
pollinator
Posts: 178
Location: Henry County Ky Zone 6
28
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
it is growing with my cucumbers and the cucumber beetles are eating the pigweed instead of cucumbers. awesome stuff
 
Jason Talmage
Posts: 13
Location: Burkburnett, TX Zone 7b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That is great to know. I am learning so much from this forum. Thank you so much.
 
I think she's lovely. It's this tiny ad that called her crazy:
19 skiddable structures microdoc - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/t/138333/skiddable-structures-microdoc-FREE
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic