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foods to gather in the PNW  RSS feed

 
Matt Ferrall
Posts: 555
Location: Western WA,usda zone 6/7,80inches of rain,250feet elevation
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So as long as Im bored I might as well start a thread about my weekly gathering.The last week has yielded many pounds of `winter oyster`mushrooms.They like alder but sometimes live on cottonwood?.The best part is the slugs are not out and you can store these frozen for as long as you want.I usually find them frozen.I guess they grow when its not?I have also been harvesting siberian miners lettuse and garlic mustard.These two pretty much grow all winter!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Location: Missoula, MT
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Any way you can post photos of these?
 
Matt Ferrall
Posts: 555
Location: Western WA,usda zone 6/7,80inches of rain,250feet elevation
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Doubtfull(just on a cell phone)The `fall` or`winter oyster mushrooms look just like a normal shelf oyster but they are yellower and have a grey,almost metalic top.This winter is really good for them here and Ive been eating them daily.They grow so slowly you dont have to worry about them going bad out there.Garlic mustard should have photos online (PFAF database)but good luck finding it as its` A` listed invasive in WA currently the only `known`population is in seattle.Cant say here where I got mine,but it makes a good edible winter green.
 
Matt Ferrall
Posts: 555
Location: Western WA,usda zone 6/7,80inches of rain,250feet elevation
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Besides the biannual  garlic mustard(Alliaria petiolata),A great reseeding annual in th Brassica family available now is the bittercresses(Cardimine sp.).I gathered a big pile yesterday roots and all.Next I agitate them in a container of water to remove the dirt.Good fresh or cooked.Got a road kill beaver 5 days ago.Will finish eating the tail(after everything else)tonight!
 
Joe Skeletor
Posts: 113
Location: Blue Island, Illinois - Zone 6a - (Lake Effect) - surrounded by zone 5b
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I'm curious as to how beaver tail tastes (And texture). How about the rest of the meat? I think I read somewhere that certain tribes considered the tail a delicacy?
J

ps- Lots of 'invasive' garlic mustards in the midwest as well. Good greens!
 
Matt Ferrall
Posts: 555
Location: Western WA,usda zone 6/7,80inches of rain,250feet elevation
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The body meat is rich and dark.I roasted it in a dutch oven with rootcrops.The tail I placed into the oven until it puffed up like a balloon.Then I pea led off the scaly part and cut up the gelatenous meat and used it in a soup.A great reseeding annual that is often found with bittercress is dead nettle/Lamium purpureum.THESE young plants taste ok but are most valued for the volume they can generate in the late winter.
ps a friend actually smuggled this collection of garlic mustard in a 2 liter pop bottle while hitchhiking across the country!
 
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