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visiting the Krameterhof

 
Lisa Schulz
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I have a question for anyone has visited the Krameterhof. What did you do about the language barrier? Did you learn German, hire a translator, or was there a translator at the Holzer's farm? How did you solve the communication issue? Was asking questions and getting answers difficult with the language barrier? Thank you for your help and answers.
 
Brenda Groth
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haven't gone, but I'm assuming that there is an AP for that
 
Lisa Schulz
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I am sorry but what are you referring to when you say they have an AP?
 
Patrick Condon
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I haven't been, but they have a tour in English. SEPT 14th I wanna say but don't remember for sure. Visit the krameterhof website in Google chrome web browser, and it will auto translate. Aside from that, I've been in Germany for 3 years and don't speak fluent German. Most folks here know a good bit of English, and are really nice and inviting. Learn the pleasantries and some permie stuff. They appreciate the effort. It's actually in Austria by the way.
 
Paulo Bessa
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I visited yesterday the Kramerterhof !!

I am still on travel and I will create a separate post regarding my exciting trip, perhaps tomorrow and on the Hugelkultur section.

I became as excited as Paul probably did when he returned first time with Seff.

Yes, the language was a BIG barrier. They have ocasionally a tour in English, but I decided to go for the tour in German, to fit with my travel plans. Most importantly, I had 3 years of living experience in Austria but still it was not enough to understand because they speak a really HARD dialect, which is even hard to understand for Germany people! In Lungau (the region) they change the sound of many vowels, and pronounce very differently many words. My girlfriend which speaks a perfect fluent German could just understand parts of it. So I really recommend the English tour, even for those with German experience like me.

Still it was an exciting thing to see with my own eyes. We concentrated very hard to understand and observe as much as we could. We also recorded video for later translation with some German friend. Because of the language barrier I returned with some important answered questions, but also with much inspiration, bubbling with ideas and with some deep insights learnt.

The Kramerterhoz has a really high biodiversity, a fantastic system of water flows, and crazy projects inspired by a much needed out-of-the-box thinking. I will post more details probably tomorrow.

In the meanwhile, and if anyone wants, please feel free to post any question you will like to see answered. Actually, this can be the thread where I detail my tour. Tomorrow I return home so I will have time to sit and write down.

 
Viktor Gruber
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Location: Austria (Zone 5)
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I went there a month ago, I didn't think their dialect was all that bad, but then again, I'm Austrian too. If you have any questions, I might be able to answer them for you.


What struck me most about the Krameterhof was just how much they turned a problem (high altitude) into a solution. 120 years ago, the rivers apparently were full with noble crayfish, but almost all of them died because of two diseases. Now, the disease can't go so far up the mountain, so they produce those crayfish - genious.
Also, the scope of time in which Sepp was thinking when he planted Swiss Pines.. They take 30-40 years until they bear fruit! Now they do, and it makes a lot of money because they are otherwise protected.
Also, growing cherries When all the other cherries are already gone, theirs are just starting to ripen, which puts them in a very favorable position on the market.
etc.
 
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